Logan Morrison wants the fences moved in at Marlins Park

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Marlins Park boasts some of the largest outfield dimensions of any stadium in the majors, so it’s no surprise that some of the team’s hitters would like to see the fences moved in. Count Logan Morrison among them.

Morrison has blasted five home runs in 158 plate appearances on the road this season compared to just one home run in 155 plate appearances at home. While he doesn’t blame his power outage solely on Marlins Park, he tells Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald that it has played a part.

“It’s definitely a factor,” Morrison said of the Marlins’ huge ballpark. “And that translates into the average not being there, too. You drive balls to the wall and they get caught. Not only is it not a homer, it’s not a hit.”

Morrison is not alone among Marlins players who would like to see the team bring the fences in.

“I think that would make it fair,” Morrison said. “But it’s not my decision.”

Marlins Park might stifle power production, but ESPN’s Park Factors notes that was 16th in the majors in run production last year and is tied for ninth this year. In other words, while balls might not be going over the fence, the vast dimensions allow for plenty of hits to fall. Morrison is an example of this, as he has a .257 batting average at home compared to a .228 batting average on the road. Still, if the fences are having an impact on the morale of the offense — it’s bad enough being a Marlin — it could be worth it to make the change. Besides, doesn’t Jeffrey Loria want the home run sculpture to do its magic?

It’s worth mentioning that Giancarlo Stanton might be wondering what the fuss is all about, as he produced significantly better at Marlins Park than anywhere else this season. Of course, he could probably play his home games in the Grand Canyon and still be successful.

MLB and MLBPA announce first set of COVID-19 test results

MLB COVID-19 test results
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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On Friday evening, Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association announced the first set of results for COVID-19 testing as part of the mandatory intake screening process under MLB’s COVID-19 Health Monitoring & Testing Plan. Per Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Athletics are not part of this data because their testing has not yet been completed.

There were 38 positive tests, accounting for 1.2% of the 3,185 samples collected and tested. 31 of the 38 individuals who tested positive are players. 19 different teams had one or more individuals test positive.

Sports Illustrated’s Emma Baccellieri notes that the positive test rate in the U.S. nationally is 8.3 percent. The NBA’s positive test rate was 7.1 percent. MLB’s positive test rate is well below average. This doesn’t necessarily mean that anything is wrong with MLB’s testing or that it’s an atypical round of testing. Rather, MLB’s testing population may more closely represent the U.S. population as a whole. Currently, because testing is still somewhat limited, those who have taken tests have tended to be those exhibiting symptoms or those who have been around others who have tested positive. If every single person in the U.S. took a test, the positive test rate would likely come in at a much lower number.

Several players who tested positive have given their consent for their identities to be made known. Those are: Delino DeShields (link), Brett Martin (link), Edward Colina, Nick Gordon, and Willians Astudillo (link). Additionally, Red Sox lefty Eduardo Rodríguez has not shown up to Red Sox camp yet because he has been around someone who tested positive, per The Athletic’s Jen McCaffrey.