Logan Morrison wants the fences moved in at Marlins Park

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Marlins Park boasts some of the largest outfield dimensions of any stadium in the majors, so it’s no surprise that some of the team’s hitters would like to see the fences moved in. Count Logan Morrison among them.

Morrison has blasted five home runs in 158 plate appearances on the road this season compared to just one home run in 155 plate appearances at home. While he doesn’t blame his power outage solely on Marlins Park, he tells Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald that it has played a part.

“It’s definitely a factor,” Morrison said of the Marlins’ huge ballpark. “And that translates into the average not being there, too. You drive balls to the wall and they get caught. Not only is it not a homer, it’s not a hit.”

Morrison is not alone among Marlins players who would like to see the team bring the fences in.

“I think that would make it fair,” Morrison said. “But it’s not my decision.”

Marlins Park might stifle power production, but ESPN’s Park Factors notes that was 16th in the majors in run production last year and is tied for ninth this year. In other words, while balls might not be going over the fence, the vast dimensions allow for plenty of hits to fall. Morrison is an example of this, as he has a .257 batting average at home compared to a .228 batting average on the road. Still, if the fences are having an impact on the morale of the offense — it’s bad enough being a Marlin — it could be worth it to make the change. Besides, doesn’t Jeffrey Loria want the home run sculpture to do its magic?

It’s worth mentioning that Giancarlo Stanton might be wondering what the fuss is all about, as he produced significantly better at Marlins Park than anywhere else this season. Of course, he could probably play his home games in the Grand Canyon and still be successful.

Cardinals shut down Carlos Martínez for two weeks due to shoulder issue

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MLB.com’s Jenifer Langosh reports that the Cardinals are shutting down pitcher Carlos Martínez from throwing for two weeks because his shoulder strength isn’t where it should have been at this point. Langosch added that an MRI showed no structural damage in Martínez’s right shoulder.

Interestingly, president of baseball operations John Mozeliak didn’t sound too happy with Martínez offseason training regimen. Per Mark Saxon of The Athletic, Mozeliak said, “Obviously, there’s a history with Carlos’ shoulder and it would be probably in everybody’s best interest if he maintained a constant or perpetual approach to that program.”

Martínez, 27, battled oblique and shoulder injuries last year. He accrued just 118 2/3 innings, making just 18 starts. He was moved to the bullpen when he returned from the disabled list in August and finished out the season in that role. Still, Martínez managed a 3.11 ERA with 117 strikeouts and 60 walks.

Langosch reported last week that the Cardinals were considering using Martínez in relief again in 2019. The latest news may push the Cardinals to indeed use Martínez out of the bullpen once again. He will be reevaluated in early March, but there is a chance he won’t be ready for Opening Day.