Cubs rally late, prevent the Braves from clinching the NL East for at least a little while

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The Braves entered the day with a magic number of one to clinch the NL East and eliminate the Washington Nationals from division title contention. If they could overcome Cubs starter Travis Wood, they could bust out the bubbly at Wrigley, but the Cubs had other ideas.

Wood surrendered a run in the fourth on an Evan Gattis RBI single to right, but other than that, he was very sharp. The lefty allowed just the one run in seven-plus innings of work, allowing five hits and walking four while striking out seven. Braves starter Kris Medlen was even better, however, holding the Cubs scoreless through seven innings. He took the mound for the eighth and even got the first out of the inning, but he was pulled after allowing a single to Starlin Castro. Lefty reliever Scott Downs came in but promptly gave up a single to Donnie Murphy and an RBI double to Anthony Rizzo, allowing the Cubs to tie the game at 1-1. David Carpenter replaced Downs, but wasn’t any better, allowing an RBI single to Dioner Navarro and a sacrifice fly to Nate Schierholtz, giving the Cubs a 3-1 lead entering the ninth.

Pedro Strop tossed an impressive ninth inning, striking out the side to wrap up the 3-1 victory and stave off the Braves’ celebration until at least the end of tonight’s Marlins-Nationals game. If the Marlins win, the Braves will clinch the East. Otherwise, the Braves will attempt to clinch tomorrow afternoon behind rookie starter Julio Teheran.

Skaggs Case: Federal Agents have interviewed at least six current or former Angels players

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The Los Angeles Times reports that federal agents have interviewed at least six current and former Angels players as part of their investigation into the death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs.

Among the players questioned: Andrew Heaney, Noé Ramirez, Trevor Cahill, and Matt Harvey. An industry source tells NBC Sports that the interviews by federal agents are part of simultaneous investigations into Skaggs’ death by United States Attorneys in both Texas and California.

There has been no suggestion that the players are under criminal scrutiny or are suspected of using opioids. Rather, they are witnesses to the ongoing investigation and their statements have been sought to shed light on drug use by Skaggs and the procurement of illegal drugs by him and others in and around the club.

Skaggs asphyxiated while under the influence of fentanyl, oxycodone, and alcohol in his Texas hotel room on July 1. This past weekend, ESPN reported that Eric Kay, the Los Angeles Angels’ Director of Communications, knew that Skaggs was an Oxycontin addict, is an addict himself, and purchased opioids for Skaggs and used them with him on multiple occasions. Kay has told DEA agents that, apart from Skaggs, at least five other Angels players are opioid users and that other Angels officials knew of Skaggs’ use. The Angels have denied Kay’s allegations.

In some ways this all resembles what happened in Pittsburgh in the 1980s, when multiple players were interviewed and subsequently called as witnesses in prosecutions that came to be known as the Pittsburgh Drug Trials. There, no baseball players were charged with crimes in connection with what was found to be a cocaine epidemic inside Major League clubhouses, but their presence as witnesses caused the prosecutions to be national news for weeks and months on end.