Edward Mujica is getting a break from the closer role

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Here’s something you don’t want to hear if you are a Cardinals fan. According to Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Cardinals closer Edward Mujica admitted yesterday that fatigue has caused him to alter his mechanics.

“My body feels like a little bit tired, and my release point is getting a little bit up,” Mujica said. “My thinking in my mind I’ve set it to get to the playoffs. One more month. Right now, I don’t want to think about (fatigue). Let’s finish it off, these nine games, and then if we make the playoffs think about the playoffs.”

Mujica has been a revelation out of the closer role for most of the season, posting a 1.73 ERA through the end of August, but he has allowed seven runs on 15 hits and two walks over 6 2/3 innings this month. He spotted the faulty mechanics during a video session yesterday, but it didn’t make an immediate impact, as he was yanked in the middle of a save chance against the Brewers. John Axford ended up bailing him out while the Cardinals won in 10 innings.

Mujica missed some time in August due to muscle tightness in his neck/back area and received anti-inflammatory medication, but Cardinals manager Mike Matheny insists that he’s healthy right now. Still, it’s clear that something isn’t right.

With a division to wrap up and the postseason rapidly approaching, this could be the time to give Trevor Rosenthal a shot in the ninth inning. The 23-year-old fireballer has a 2.73 ERA and 103/20 K/BB ratio over 72 1/3 innings this season. He ranks fourth among relievers (min. 60 IP) with 12.82 K/9.

UPDATE: ESPN’s Buster Olney reports that Mujica has been removed from the closer role for the next few days and perhaps longer.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.