Arizona senator John McCain calls the Dodgers “a bunch of overpaid, immature, arrogant, spoiled brats”

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Like many people in Arizona, senator John McCain is very upset about the Dodgers celebrating their division title by jumping into the Diamondbacks’ pool last night:

Incidentally, according to CNN.com McCain’s net worth was approximately $40 million as of 2006.

For anyone who missed it last night, the Dodgers won the NL West title in Arizona and the players made a mad dash for the pool in the Chase Field outfield from which fans watch games. They hopped in, which you can see in the video below:

And then various Diamondbacks– led by utility man Willie Bloomquist–got very upset, calling the Dodgers “classless” among other things. Diamondbacks right-hander Brandon McCarthy had a different response than most of his teammates, tweeting late last night:

McCain disagrees, though.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.