Dodgers clinch first National League West title since 2009

30 Comments

It wasn’t too long ago that Dodgers manager Don Mattingly was on the brink of being fired, but now his team is the first in MLB to clinch a division title this season. What a wild ride.

The Dodgers defeated the Diamondbacks 7-6 this afternoon at Chase Field to wrap up the National League West. It is their first division title since 2009.

The Dodgers trailed 6-3 after the third inning, but they chipped away until A.J. Ellis put them ahead with a solo homer off Josh Collmenter in the top of the eighth inning. Hanley Ramirez, who sat out Wednesday with lingering back issues, went 4-for-5 with two homers and four RBI in the victory.

Mattingly’s job was in danger when the high-priced Dodgers were sitting in last place at 30-42 on June 21, but they have gone a major league-best 58-23 since. While the remarkable turnaround is complete and the division is decided, the Dodgers still have home-field in the National League to play for. As of now, both the Cardinals and Braves have better records. Still, they will be a very formidable opponent come postseason time.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.