Rays run scoreless innings streak to 27 before collapsing late against the Twins

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The Rays entered this afternoon’s contest against the Twins having completed back-to-back shutouts. Starter Chris Archer shut them out over six innings on Friday while Matt Moore went three innings in a rain-soaked affair last night. The last time a Rays pitcher had allowed a run was in the sixth inning on Thursday against the Red Sox, when Stephen Drew doubled against Jamey Wright.

The great pitching continued for six innings today before starter David Price faltered, bringing the streak to 27 consecutive scoreless innings. The Rays went ahead 3-0 on a Wil Myers two-run home run in the fourth and a Sean Rodriguez solo shot in the fifth.  Price took the hill in the seventh, but he loaded the bases with one out, prompting manager Joe Maddon to call upon Jake McGee. McGee surrendered a two-run single to Chris Parmelee, then recorded consecutive strikeouts to end the inning.

The Rays added an insurance run in the top of the eighth on a James Loney RBI single. Joel Peralta, making his American League-leading 73rd appearance of the season, got two quick outs in the bottom of the eighth and appeared to be on his way to an easy inning. Ryan Doumit slugged a solo home run to right-center to bring the Twins within a run. Peralta allowed a single to Trevor Plouffe and a walk to Josh Willingham before Josmil Pinto drove a three-run homer to left-center, putting the Twins up 6-4. It proved to be the game-winner as closer Glen Perkins tossed a perfect ninth for his 35th save of the season.

Entering the afternoon, the Rays were tied with the Rangers at 81-66 for the two Wild Card spots. The Indians, clearly visible in the rear-view mirror, were just a game and a half behind. As the Rangers lost, the Rays will be no worse than a game in front for the second Wild Card as the rest of today’s action unfolds.

Larry Walker to wear a Rockies cap on his Hall of Fame plaque

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I guess this came out the day he was elected but I missed it somehow: Larry Walker is going to have a Rockies cap on his Fall of Fame plaque.

While it was once solely the choice of the inductee, for the past couple of decades the Hall of Fame has had final say on the caps, though the request of the inductee is noted. This is done to prevent a situation in which a cap truly misrepresents history. This issue arose around the time Wade Boggs was inducted, as he reportedly had a deal with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays to pick their cap on his plaque which, to say the least, would’ve been unrepresentative.

There have been some mildly controversial picks in the past, and some guys who would seem to have a clear choice have gone with blank caps to avoid upsetting the fan base of one of his other teams, but Walker’s doesn’t seem all that controversial to me.

Walker played ten years in Colorado to six years in Montreal and two years in St. Louis. His numbers in Colorado were substantial better than in Montreal. His MVP Award, most of his Gold Gloves, most of his All-Star appearances, and all of his black ink with the exception of the NL doubles title in 1994 came with the Rockies too. Walker requested the Rockies cap, noting correctly that he “did more damage” in a Rockies uniform than anyplace else. And, of course, that damage is what got him elected to the Hall of Fame.

Still, I imagine fans of the old Expos will take at least some issue here. Those folks tend to be pretty possessive of their team’s old stars. It’s understandable, I suppose, given that they’ve not gotten any new ones in a decade or two. Add in the fact that Walker played for the 1994 Expos team onto which people love to project things both reasonable and unreasonable, and you can expect that the Expos dead-enders might feel a bit slighted.

Welp, sorry. A Rockies cap is the right choice.  And that’s Walker’s cap will feature.