The singing hot dog vendor was fired for his anti-ketchup views

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Over the weekend we noted how Comerica Park’s famous singing hot dog vendor, Charley Marcuse, was fired. We presumed it was because of, you know, the singing. But that’s not what some people are saying. From the Detroit News:

There are rumblings the real reason was ketchup — or Marcuse’s disdain for it. Marcuse, at the ballpark and on Twitter, has been a strong crusader for only putting mustard on a frank. And some fans thought he got combative when they asked for ketchup. There were complaints filed.

Politics, man. Politics.

For what it’s worth, I respect the purists who go mustard-only on hot dogs. And, for the most part, that’s how I roll myself.  But I’ve liberalized my views on this over the past year or so. Men and women died for our freedoms in this country, and one of those freedoms is to put ketchup on a gosh dang hot dog if you want. And if that’s what you want, far be it from me to condemn you for it.

Or, as Voltaire put it, I may disapprove of what you put on your hot dog, but I will defend to the death your right to put it there, you know, on your hot dog.  At least I’m almost positive that that’s what he was talking about.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.