The singing hot dog vendor was fired for his anti-ketchup views

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Over the weekend we noted how Comerica Park’s famous singing hot dog vendor, Charley Marcuse, was fired. We presumed it was because of, you know, the singing. But that’s not what some people are saying. From the Detroit News:

There are rumblings the real reason was ketchup — or Marcuse’s disdain for it. Marcuse, at the ballpark and on Twitter, has been a strong crusader for only putting mustard on a frank. And some fans thought he got combative when they asked for ketchup. There were complaints filed.

Politics, man. Politics.

For what it’s worth, I respect the purists who go mustard-only on hot dogs. And, for the most part, that’s how I roll myself.  But I’ve liberalized my views on this over the past year or so. Men and women died for our freedoms in this country, and one of those freedoms is to put ketchup on a gosh dang hot dog if you want. And if that’s what you want, far be it from me to condemn you for it.

Or, as Voltaire put it, I may disapprove of what you put on your hot dog, but I will defend to the death your right to put it there, you know, on your hot dog.  At least I’m almost positive that that’s what he was talking about.

Mariano Rivera elected to Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously

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Former Yankees closer Mariano Rivera deservingly became the first player ever inducted into the Hall of Fame unanimously, receiving votes from all 425 writers who submitted ballots. Previously, the closest players to unanimous induction were Ken Griffey, Jr. (99.32% in 2016), Tom Seaver (98.84% in 1992), Nolan Ryan (98.79% in 1999), Cal Ripken, Jr. (98.53%), Ty Cobb (98.23% in 1936), and George Brett (98.19% in 1999).

Because so many greats were not enshrined in Cooperstown unanimously, many voters in the past argued against other players getting inducted unanimously, withholding their votes for otherwise deserving players. That Griffey — both one of the greatest outfielders of all time and one of the most popular players of all time — wasn’t voted in unanimously in 2016, for example, seemed to signal that no player ever would. Now that Rivera has been, this tired argument about voting unanimity can be laid to rest.

Derek Jeter will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time next year. He may become the second player ever to be elected unanimously. David Ortiz appears on the 2022 ballot and could be No. 3. Now that Rivera has broken through, these are possibilities whereas before they might not have been.

Another tired argument around Hall of Fame voting concerns whether or not a player is a “first ballot” Hall of Famer. Some voters think getting enshrined in a player’s first year of eligibility is a greater honor than getting in any subsequent year. I’m not sure what it will take to get rid of this argument — other than the electorate getting younger and more open-minded — but at least we have made progress on at least one bad Hall of Fame take.