The food that fuels ballplayers

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Good story from Alyson Footer of MLB.com about the evolution of food in the clubhouse. Even a generation ago — when Kirk Gibson and Don Mattingly played — it was all about cold cuts and candy. Davey Johnson goes back farther and talks of “cheese, crackers and beer.”

Now, totally different, obviously, and Footer talks to ballplayers and team nutritionist types who make sure that major leaguers have healthy options to help them reach maximum athletic performance. The Nationals even have a dedicated personal chef who talks about the need for athletes to eliminate processed foods and take control over their diet. He says:

“Sports culinary is one of the last untapped markets,” he said. “Teams are now starting to really look at food as everything. You want the best performance and the least amount of injuries, and if you eat garbage, your body is inflamed the whole time. From that inflammation, you get injured. You definitely want to treat them right and give them the best.”

Every time I hear this stuff I first nod my head, because it’s absolutely right.  Then I wonder why minor leaguers are still expected to live on pizza and fast food and are given neither the time, the transportation nor the financial means to seek out better food options before and after games. Really, a ton of these guys, especially in the low minors, subsist on bologna at home McDonald’s on the road.

You’d think that the first team to make a bigger investment in the eating and living conditions of their minor leaguers would reap some sort of reward for it.

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.