The food that fuels ballplayers

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Good story from Alyson Footer of MLB.com about the evolution of food in the clubhouse. Even a generation ago — when Kirk Gibson and Don Mattingly played — it was all about cold cuts and candy. Davey Johnson goes back farther and talks of “cheese, crackers and beer.”

Now, totally different, obviously, and Footer talks to ballplayers and team nutritionist types who make sure that major leaguers have healthy options to help them reach maximum athletic performance. The Nationals even have a dedicated personal chef who talks about the need for athletes to eliminate processed foods and take control over their diet. He says:

“Sports culinary is one of the last untapped markets,” he said. “Teams are now starting to really look at food as everything. You want the best performance and the least amount of injuries, and if you eat garbage, your body is inflamed the whole time. From that inflammation, you get injured. You definitely want to treat them right and give them the best.”

Every time I hear this stuff I first nod my head, because it’s absolutely right.  Then I wonder why minor leaguers are still expected to live on pizza and fast food and are given neither the time, the transportation nor the financial means to seek out better food options before and after games. Really, a ton of these guys, especially in the low minors, subsist on bologna at home McDonald’s on the road.

You’d think that the first team to make a bigger investment in the eating and living conditions of their minor leaguers would reap some sort of reward for it.

Nick Senzel to miss a few weeks due to ankle injury

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Reds prospect Nick Senzel will miss at least the next few weeks due to a sprained right ankle, Bobby Nightengale of the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. Senzel suffered the injury in a minor league game on Monday, sliding into second base.

Last week, the Reds reassigned Senzel to minor league camp. His agent, Joel Wolfe, called it an “egregious case of service time manipulation.” The matter has been cleanly resolved with the injury, not unlike Vladimir Guerrero, Jr.

Senzel, 23, is the Reds’ No. 1 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline. He was getting work in center field this spring after playing second and third base last year (and even a game at shortstop) in the minors. With Triple-A Louisville, Senzel hit .310/.378/.509 with six home runs and 25 RBI in 193 plate appearances.