The Blue Jays will be playing on grass eventually

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Its crazy to think about it if you came to baseball in the 70s and early 80s, but now there are only two parks in Major League Baseball with artificial turf: Rogers Centre in Toronto and Tropicana Field in St. Pete.  Within a few years there will be only one.

From the Globe and Mail, news that the CFL’s Argonauts — the biggest reason they keep turf in Rogers Centre — are going to be out of the joint by 2018 at the latest, and that it seems like the Jays are going to put grass on the field. It’ll be hard, but not impossible:

“Nothing’s impossible. Everything can be engineered … but it’s not as simple as trucking in dirt and laying sod down,” said Steve Schiedel, vice-president of Greenhorizons Group of Farms Ltd., a Cambridge, Ont.-based company that installed a temporary grass field in Rogers Centre during the summer of 2010, for a pair of soccer matches. Because Rogers Centre is surrounded symmetrically by high walls to support the retractable roof, special lighting may be required to stimulate grass growth. But the biggest hurdle is lack of drainage.

For that they’ll dig up the concrete below and add a drainage system. Then: grass. Hopefully.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.