Evan Gattis hit the longest home run of the season against Cole Hamels

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Evan Gattis was the Braves’ only source of offense this afternoon against Cole Hamels in the series finale in Philadelphia. The Braves scored two runs on two hits, both Gattis solo home runs — one in the second inning, and one in the seventh, giving him 18 on the season. The Phillies scored twice in the first inning against Braves starter Paul Maholm on an RBI double by Chase Utley and an RBI single by Darin Ruf.

After Hamels tossed a scoreless eighth inning, running his pitch count to 99, Darin Ruf cracked a tie-breaking solo home run to right field against Braves reliever David Carpenter. B.J. Rosenberg was called on in the ninth to lock down the save, and he retired the Braves in short order for his first career save. The Phillies complete a sweep for the first time since June 3-5 against the Marlins. The Braves were last swept August 22-24 against the Cardinals.

The first home run by Gattis, which landed in the concourse area in left-center at Citizens Bank Park, was measured at 486 feet, the longest of the season according to ESPN Stats & Info. Logan Morrison hit one to right-center at Marlins Park on Friday that measured at 484 feet.

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Astros fan logs trash can bangs from 2017

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A fascinating and no doubt time consuming research project was released this morning. An Astros fan by the name of Tony Adams went through every Astros home game in the 2017 season and logged trash can bangs. Which, as you know, was the mechanism via which Astros players in the clubhouse signaled to hitters which pitch was coming.

Adams listened to every pitch from the Astros’ 2017 home games and made a note of any banging noise he could detect. There were 20 home games for which he did not have access to video. There were three “home” games which took place at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida due to the team being displaced by hurricane Harvey and for which, obviously, the Astros’ camera setup from Minute Maid Park would not have been applicable.

Adams logged over 8,200 pitches and found banging before over 1,100 of those pitches. He graphed which players got the most bangs during their at batsMarwin Gonzalez got the most, with bangs coming before 147 of 776 pitches seen, followed by George Springer, who got bangs on 139 of 933. José Altuve had the least among regulars, with only 24 bangs in 866 pitches. One gets the sense that, perhaps, he felt that the banging would interfere with his normal pitch recognition process or something. Either way it’s worth noting that a lack of banging was also signal. Specifically, for a fastball. As such, Astros hitters were helped on a much higher percentage of pitches than what is depicted in the graphs themselves.

Adams reminds us that Commissioner Manfred’s report stated that the Astros also used hand-clapping, whistling, and yelling early in the season before settling on trash can banging. Those things were impossible to detect simply by watching video. As it is, Adams’ graphs of bangs-per-game shows that the can-banging plan dramatically ramped-up on May 28.

It’s hard to say anything definitive about the scope and effectiveness of the Astros’ sign-stealing scheme based on this study alone. Adams may or may not have been hearing everything and, as he notes, there may have been a lot more pitches relayed thought means other than trash can banging than we know. Alternatively it’s possible that Adams was marking some sounds as bangs that were not, in fact, Astros players sending signals to the batter. It’s probably an inexact science.

Still, this is an impressive undertaking that no doubt took a ton of time. And it at least begins to provide a glimpse into the Astros’ sign-stealing operation.