Todd Helton doubles in the seventh for 2,500th career hit

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Long time Rockies first baseman Todd Helton sliced a double down the left field line against Reds reliever Curtis Partch in the bottom of the seventh for his 2,500th career hit. Helton narrowly beat left fielder Chris Heisey’s throw to second base for the double. There was a brief pause in the game as Helton took off his helmet and acknowledged the standing ovation given to him by the excited crowd at Coors Field.

Helton, now 40 years old and in his 17th Major League season, had been hitless in his previous seven attempts to get #2,500. He went 2-for-5 with two three-run home runs on Friday, but struck out three times in four at-bats tonight and was 0-for-2 with an intentional walk today. Helton is also seven RBI away from 1,400 for his career. Today’s double was the 584th of his career, leaving him one shy of Rafael Palmeiro for 16th on the all-time list.

The Rockies had a 7-2 lead over the Reds at the time of Helton’s double, well on their way to an easy victory in the series finale. They had beaten up Reds starter Mike Leake for six runs in four innings. Meanwhile, Rockies starter Tyler Chatwood could only last two innings before being pulled due to a bruised thumb.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.