How to turn a guaranteed contract into a non-guaranteed contract

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Jeff Passan has an interesting story over at Yahoo! today. It’s a look at the language teams are increasingly inserting into individual player contracts which outline the circumstances under which a player’s contract can be transformed from a guaranteed deal to a non-guaranteed one.

It doesn’t happen often — Passan notes three players who have had it happen, and in each case a settlement on the final dollars owed was reached — but he reports that teams are increasingly looking for ways to hedge against risk. Or, if you are skeptical of team intentions, look for ways out of bad deals. For now the bulk of the language relates to thinks like engaging in dangerous activities such as skydiving, skiing and martial arts. There are moves, however, particularly by the Cubs, Nats and Yankees, to try to build in language that covers PEDs.

As Passan notes such language is likely trumped by the Joint Drug Agreement and the CBA. But it’s an area that some in the union may worry will be one in which teams attempt to become more proactive.

Fascinating stuff, particularly the exhaustive list of prohibited activities in Cubs contracts. It sort of puts a whole new twist on that Rogers Hornsby quote in which he said he spent his offseason looking out the window and waiting for spring. These days, it seems, that’s all a player could do without risking his contract.

Yoenis Cespedes may need season-ending surgery

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Yoenis Cespedes is facing potential season-ending surgery, the outfielder told reporters following the Mets’ 7-5 win over the Yankees on Friday. Newly-returned from the disabled list after rehabbing a hip flexor strain and quad tightness, Cespedes appeared to be back to his old self after going 2-for-4 with a walk, base hit, and home run (his ninth of the year) during Friday’s series opener, but later remarked that he was suffering from calcification in both of his heels.

The only remedy, it appears, is a surgery that would require anywhere from 8-10 months of recovery. Should he elect to undergo the procedure now, it goes without saying that he won’t be able to return to the field before end of the regular season. On the other hand, if he postpones the surgery until the offseason, he could miss the first half of the Mets’ run in 2019.

The pain doesn’t seem to be debilitating, at least for the time being, but Cespedes added that any discomfort in his heels causes him to stand, walk, and run differently, which presents a definite problem if the club intends to ramp up his workload going forward. The Mets have yet to announce a final decision regarding any surgical procedure, though they will bench the outfielder for Saturday’s matinee against the Yankees. Following yesterday’s impressive performance, Cespedes is currently batting .262/.325/.496 on the year with 15 extra-base hits, three stolen bases, and an .821 OPS through 157 PA.