The lesson to take away from Yasiel Puig’s benching

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As Ken Rosenthal notes in his excellent column on the matter this morning, Yasiel Puig’s mid-game benching yesterday was the result of him not breaking up a double play when most players would, making some showy catches and for loafing it out to the field at the end of an inning.  Rosenthal also notes that manager Don Mattingly’s handling of the situation — and Puig’s accepting responsibility for it after the game — was quite good.

Can’t disagree with any of that. I will make an observation in the wake of one of Rosenthal’s comments, however:

A number of statistical analysts howled last week at the notion of benching Puig, noting that his various mistakes paled in importance to his overall contribution.

I can’t speak for anyone besides me, but to the extent I took issue with the bench-Puig stuff last week it wasn’t in terms of how Mattingly was going about his business or even the need to do something to reign in Puig’s alleged excesses.  The Dodgers are Don Mattingly’s team and he knows it best. If a player is in need of some discipline it is the manager’s decision. Both the fine and/or benching which happened in Miami last week and pulling him out of yesterday’s game was A-OK with me.

Where I did (and still do) take issue is with the reaction to all of this by many in the media who are acting as if Puig is some special case or if a player ruffling feathers is something new and scandalous. Players are benched or disciplined multiple times a year for such things. Sometimes it’s even established veterans like Jimmy Rollins who had his own little issue with this sort of thing a year ago tomorrow.

That isn’t to say it isn’t newsworthy. Puig is an exciting and important player so if he does have a run-in with his manager it is certainly news. But what it is not is an occasion to make it a referendum on his very character or to describe it as “Berzerk-O” behavior that puts the Dodgers’ very future at risk like some did last week.

This happens. It’s a story. It’s a bigger story if the manager refuses to handle it or the player refuses to respond. But we’re not seeing that with Puig and, as such, it doesn’t justify the sort of outrage and hyperbole the matter has thus far gotten from some quarters.

Red Sox end Astros’ 10-game winning streak

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The Red Sox salvaged the final game of their three-game home series against the Astros, winning 4-3 on Sunday afternoon. In doing so, they ended the Astros’ 10-game winning streak.

Xander Bogaerts struck the decisive blow, knocking in a run with a double in the seventh inning to break a 3-3 tie. Michael Chavis also hit another homer — his eighth of the season — while Mookie Betts collected three hits and scored three runs to raise his OPS to .899.

The Astros last lost on May 7 against the Royals, the second game of a three-game series. The Astros won the final game of that set, then swept the Rangers in a four-game series, the Tigers in three, and won the first two games against the Red Sox. It’s their second 10-game winning streak of the season, as they won 10 striaght between April 5-16, sweeping the Athletics, Yankees, and Mariners before losing the second of two games against the A’s in Oakland.

At 31-16, the Astros are slightly behind the Twins — in progress as of this writing — for the best winning percentage in the majors. The Red Sox, meanwhile, have made up some ground after ending April 13-17. They’re now 24-22, good for third place in the AL East.