Zack Greinke is hitting .340 (oh, and he also took a shutout into the ninth inning)

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Not only did Zack Greinke take a shutout into the ninth inning against the Cubs last night to improve to 13-3 with a 2.86 ERA, he also went 1-for-2 with an RBI single and a walk at the plate to continue a remarkable season offensively.

Greinke is hitting .340 with a .426 on-base percentage in 59 plate appearances. For some context, Yadier Molina leads the league with a .332 batting average and Joey Votto leads the league with a .438 on-base percentage.

Greinke has an .809 OPS, which is higher than, among other NL hitters, Brandon Phillips, Chase Headley, Ryan Zimmerman, Starling Marte, Pedro Alvarez, Jason Heyward, Hunter Pence, Andre Ethier, Adam LaRoche, David Freese, and Pablo Sandoval. Dodgers teammate Adrian Gonzalez is also on that list and in fact Greinke has a higher OPS than every Dodgers hitter except Hanley Ramirez, Yasiel Puig, and Scott Van Slyke.

As for pitchers hitting, the last one to get at least 50 plate appearances and post an on-base percentage above Greinke’s current .426 mark was fellow Dodgers star Don Newcombe at .434 in 1958. That was the Dodgers’ first season in Los Angeles and they traded the former MVP and Cy Young winner to the Reds in June.

And here’s the really weird part: Prior to this season Greinke was a career .170 hitter with 23 strikeouts versus three walks in 123 plate appearances, although he did have three homers and five doubles. This year he has the same number of walks (6) as strikeouts (6) and zero homers.

Dale Murphy’s son hit in eye by rubber bullet during protest

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Atlanta Braves legend Dale Murphy took to Twitter last night and talked about his son, who was injured while taking part in a protest in Denver.

Murphy said his son nearly lost his eye after he was hit in the face by a rubber bullet while peacefully marching. He later shared a photo (see below). “Luckily, his eye was saved due to a kind stranger that was handing out goggles to protestors shortly before the shooting and another kind stranger that drove him to the ER,” Murphy said.

Murphy had far more to say about the protests, however, than how it related to his son:

“As terrible as this experience has been, we know that it’s practically nothing compared to the systemic racism and violence against Black life that he was protesting in the first place. Black communities across America have been terrorized for centuries by excessive police force . . . If you’re a beneficiary of systemic racism, then you will not be able to dismantle it at no cost to yourself. You will have to put yourself at risk. It might not always result in being physically attacked, but it will require you to make yourself vulnerable.”