YES doesn’t note when Robinson Cano doesn’t hustle? Really?

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Fun stuff from Phil Mushnick of the Post: he hates the fact that Robinson Cano doesn’t hustle. And he hates it even more that the Yankees broadcasters at YES don’t call Cano out for it. Really, he lays into the network for not noticing this, accusing them of being the Yankees’ Pravda or something:

So is the silence of Yankee TV commentators who for some reason — perhaps a lack of guidance from YES management or YES’ fear of having to hear from Yankee management — feel that we don’t know good baseball from bad … Yet, the Yankee TV guys, Ken Singleton, David Cone and Lou Piniella, ignored what had just happened. They passed on Cano’s inconceivable disregard for playing winning baseball before they even had a chance to change the subject. Piniella, three-time Manager of the Year for crying out loud, said nothing! Standard Cano, followed by standard TV indulgence.

I guess Mushnick doesn’t watch every game — or else he doesn’t read HBT — because if he did he would have remembered that just a couple of weeks ago YES’ Michael Kay spent a long time going after Cano for not hustling down the line. Oh well, I guess it doesn’t count if the only one doing it is the LEAD BROADCASTER ON THE NETWORK.

Not that it should matter. Joe Girardi has been asked about Cano’s habit of not running out 4-3 grounders at full speed all the time and Girardi says he doesn’t care. Nor should he, given that Cano is the one superstar he’s got who has been consistently healthy and given that the dude is hitting .307/.386/.510.

Maybe the failure to give 110% when it doesn’t matter is bothersome to people, but I’ll take that line and some occasional jogging over a guy who busts it down the line in the course of making far more outs or a guy who pulls a hamstring in the name of empty, showy hustle.

Rays’ Díaz gets $24 million, three-year deal, avoids arbitration

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Tampa Bay Rays infielder Yandy Díaz agreed to a $24 million, three-year contract on Tuesday that avoided a salary arbitration hearing.

Díaz’s agreement could be worth $36 million over four seasons.

The 31-year old will receive $6 million this season, $8 million in 2024 and $10 million for 2025. The 2026 club is $12 million with no buyout. There is a $1 million assignment bonus that would be payable by receiving team.

Díaz has spent parts of six seasons in the majors with Cleveland (2017-18) and Tampa Bay (2019-22). He has a career average of .278 with 39 home runs and 198 RBIs.

Acquired by the Rays in a three-team trade on Dec. 13, 2018, Díaz hit .296 with nine homers and 57 RBIs in 137 games last season, He career highs with 71 runs, 140 hits, 33 doubles, and 78 walks.

Díaz was the third Rays’ arbitration-eligible player to reach a deal.

Reliever Pete Fairbanks agreed Friday to a $12 million, three-year contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons. The 29-year-old right-hander was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Left-hander Jeffrey Springs also agreed last week to a $31 million, four-year contract that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

The 30-year-old began last season in the bullpen and transitioned to the starting rotation in May and finished 9-5 with a 2.46 ERA in 33 appearances, including 25 starts.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, and outfielder Harold Ramírez.