Today we mark a couple of notable baseball broadcast anniversaries

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I’ll talk these up tomorrow when the latest Hardball History video comes out, but it’s worth noting a couple of notable baseball broadcast anniversaries on the day they happened.

Seventy-four years ago today, on August 26, 1939, NBC televised the first major league game in history on its experimental station W2XBS. It was a Dodgers-Reds tilt, as they played a doubleheader that day.  We don’t have any attendance numbers for those games and we certainly don’t have any Nielsen ratings for the broadcast given that, like, four people on the planet had TVs then.  But we do know this much: thanks to Major League Baseball’s ridiculous blackout rules, more people were able to watch that 1939 Reds-Dodgers game than people in Las Vegas in 2013 can watch a Dodgers-Padres game or people in parts of Iowa can watch a Cubs-Cardinals game.

Also of note: while 1939 seems like ages and ages ago, it was only 11 years after that when Vin Scully began calling Dodgers games. He’s, of course, still at it today.

Moving to the digital age: On August 26, 2002 the first video streaming coverage of a major league baseball game took place on the internet. Approximately 30,000 fans visited MLB.com to see the Yankees defeat the Rangers, 10-3. That’s far short of the over 42,000 who saw the game live in Yankee Stadium, but it’s a pretty solid number for the pre-Facebook/Twitter age.

Some day all games will be available on multiple platforms and watched wherever and whenever the viewer deigns it so, without blackouts. Hopefully it takes less than 74 years for it to happen.

Report: Yankees could be in on Nolan Arenado

Nolan Arenado
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The Yankees appear to have moved on from free agent Manny Machado this winter, but could they be turning their attention to Rockies superstar Nolan Arenado? That’s the idea floated by Andy Martino of SNY, who hears that GM Brian Cashman has been involved in recent discussions concerning the third baseman. No official comments have been made to the press yet, though, and it’s not clear whether the Yankees would prefer to pursue Arenado prior to the 2019 season or partway through it.

The 27-year-old infielder earned his fourth consecutive All-Star nomination, Silver Slugger, and Gold Glove award in 2018 after slashing .297/.374/.561 with 38 home runs, a .935 OPS, and 5.7 fWAR across 673 plate appearances. There’s no question he’s provided immense value to Colorado’s lineup over the last half-decade, and his consistency and incredible power at the plate helped form the basis of the record $30 million arbitration figure he presented to the team last week. The Rockies countered at $24 million, however, and in doing so may have jeopardized their chances of convincing the infielder to forego free agency in 2020 and take a long-term deal instead.

Assuming he declines to negotiate an extension with the Rockies, Arenado’s decorated résumé and career-best 2018 numbers should attract plenty of interest around the league — a reality that could put considerable pressure on the Yankees (or any other interested party) to finesse a deal sooner rather than later. For now, the club is prepared to enter the 2019 season with hot-hitting third baseman Miguel Andújar, whom Martino speculates would be the “centerpiece” of any trade with Colorado.