Mets recall Lucas Duda from Triple-A

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The Mets announced this morning that they have recalled Lucas Duda from Triple-A Las Vegas. In turn, Mike Baxter has been optioned back down to the minors.

Duda batted .235/.353/.438 with 11 home runs and 23 RBI through 68 games this season prior to landing on the disabled list with an oblique strain in late June. After completing a rehab assignment, the 27-year-old was optioned to Triple-A, where he hit .306 (19-for-62) with zero homers, three doubles and a 15/14 K/BB ratio over 18 games.

As Adam Rubin of ESPNNewYork.com notes, because Duda was in the minors for less than 20 days after being optioned, the Mets will not lose his option status for this year. This means he will have one option left for 2014.

Duda primarily played first base while in Triple-A, but it’s unclear what role he’ll have now that he’s back with the big club. Ike Davis owns a .272/.435/.439 batting line in 41 games since returning from his demotion, though he’s currently in a 5-for-29 funk. While Eric Young, Jr. has struggled at the plate over the past month or so, the Mets probably don’t want to see Duda lumbering around in left field again.

Ichiro wore a fake mustache to sneak into the Mariners’ dugout

Associated Press
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Ichiro Suzuki is now a Mariners employee and, as such, he’s not allowed to sit in the dugout during a game. That’s for coaches and players only.

He knows that, too. Indeed, on the day Ichiro announced his sorta-retirement, he talked about how it was going to be hard not to be down on the field with the other players. He even made a ridiculous joke about how, “[he] can’t say for certain that maybe [he] won’t put on a beard and glasses and be like Bobby Valentine and be in the dugout.”

In related news, this mysterious stranger was seen by an Associated Press photographer in the Mariners dugout during the first couple of innings of the M’s-Yankees game:

(AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)

No beard, but I guess that joke was not very ridiculous after all. Either way, by the end of the second inning — poof — he was gone.

Obviously, when something interesting like this happens you mustache an expert for their opinion on the matter. To that end, the Associated Press reached Bobby Valentine, who famously did the same thing after an ejection way back in 1999, for comment:

“He was perfect. I never would have known it was him.”

Valentine was suspended for two games and fined $5,000. I’m assuming Ichiro won’t get hit quite as hard given that he wasn’t defying an umpire’s authority, but even if he does have to pay a fine, he’ll likely do so willingly.