Why do people want apologies from bad people anyway?

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Some more thoughts about Ryan Braun’s apology and the disappointed reactions thereto:

The weirdest thing about the reactions from the “Braun’s apology wasn’t good enough” camp is that, generally speaking, they come from people who are usually totally comfortable making stark character judgments. The “this guy is bad and evil and a cheater and a liar, and that’s what defines him” sort of stuff. Which, fine, everyone is allowed their opinion.

But if you are the sort of person to make those sorts of judgments why, exactly, do you want an apology or expect anything from one?  Why do you expect the subject in question — here Braun — to suddenly cast off the traits you are so certain he has and come clean and repent in convincing fashion? Doesn’t the lack of an apology or remorse better fit your assessment of his character? You should not be surprised at all. Indeed, if you are right about the person in question, you shouldn’t expect one. Or at least one that is actually intended to show the remorse and contrition you are so certain he lacks to begin with.

Which makes me wonder what the point of this apology judging really is.  I see two possibilities. Maybe there are more, but two stick out to me:

1. Writers like stories to actually be stories with beginnings, middles and ends. And those ends are best if they are happy endings in which the bad guy is taught a lesson and maybe a group hug is had. It makes for a satisfying narrative. The dissatisfaction at the apology is not that it reveals Braun to be a bad guy — they’re already convinced of that — it’s that this jerk Braun is depriving us of a happy ending in which the good guys win and the bad guys are shown the error of their ways;

2. People like their confirmation-bias. It’s satisfying. And rather than just note that the p.r.-driven apology was a predictable exercise in p.r., the layer of dissatisfaction at the apology is ladled on because it scratches the itch we have for our previous opinions to be validated.

I believe that bad people exist. I think that, generally speaking, Ryan Braun has shown himself to be a bad guy. He lies. He cheats. He throws friends and colleagues under the bus. Pretty low rent. Given that, I’m not sure why we should expect any statement he makes to show genuine public contrition and I’m not sure why he’s owed any added criticism for failing to live up to that unrealistic expectation. As I’ve said before, I’d hope he offers personal apologies to people he directly wronged but I kinda don’t give a flip how he executes his public relations game and don’t think that and that alone can or should change the public’s opinion of him. We are what we do, not what we say.

But even if he fails to live up to that low standard, let’s stop acting surprised that there are bad people in the world who get away with stuff sometimes or who are, in the view of many, punished more lightly than they should be.

 

Check out these Union Jack-themed caps for the London Series

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UPDATE: Here is what, in my view anyway, constitutes a sad update. The Yankees and Red Sox will not, themselves, be wearing these cool Union Jack caps on the field during the London Series games. They will be wearing regular caps with a special patch.

The good news is that the Union Jack caps will still be available to purchase if you’re so inclined. They’re just not going to be official on-field replicas. Alas.

My verbiage about the propriety of wearing Union Jack baseball-themed merchandise below still stands.

12:45 PM: Patriots in Boston led the fight against Great Britain for an independent America. The popularization of the word “yankee” has its origins in an often derogatory term British military and political leaders used for people native to the American colonies. In light of that, with the possible exception of the Nationals — it’s hard to find two teams with a better regional and/or etymological claim on, well, not being British.

But, when in Rome, do as the Romans do. here are the caps Major League Baseball just revealed the Yankees and Red Sox will be wearing in London when they meet next month:

And check out the crown on the back:

My intro to this article aside, I have no problem with these at all. Indeed, they look pretty cool. I’ve seen some people being grumpy about it seriously, in contrast to my jokingly, citing the history of the colonies and the Revolution and all of that and calling them inappropriate, but c’mon. These are some boss caps.

Besides (a) the war ended 238 years ago; and (b) we probably stole baseball from them anyway. Let your freak flag– er, Jack, fly.