After 11 seasons in minors, Cody Clark to make major league debut

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31-year-old catcher Cody Clark was called up by the Astros on Friday and will make his major league debut 10 years after originally being drafted by the Rangers.

Clark is the replacement on the roster for Max Stassi, who suffered a concussion after he was hit in the face by a pitch on Wednesday.

Clark was originally a 48th-round pick by the Blue Jays out of high school. He opted to go to Wichita State rather than sign, and he was taken in the 11th round by Texas in 2003. The Rangers, though, weren’t impressed by his offense and released him in 2005. He spent the rest of that year playing Indy ball, joined the Braves’ low-A club in 2006 and then logged six years in the Royals system before joining the Astros on a minor league deal last winter.

Obviously, it took a few breaks to get him his chance now. Never much of a hitter, he’s really fallen off these last couple of years; he hit just .180/.246/.268 for Triple-A Omaha last year and he was at .217/.258/.273 in 158 Triple-A at-bats this season. There’s not really any chance of him playing any long-term role with the Astros, and it’s quite possible he won’t even last for the rest of the year. But after 11 seasons, he can finally say he’s made it. There probably won’t be anyone happier to be in a major league dugout tonight.

Diamondbacks, T.J. McFarland avoid arbitration

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that the Diamondbacks and reliever T.J. McFarland have avoided arbitration, agreeing on a $1.45 million salary for the 2019 season. McFarland, in his third of four years of arbitration eligibility, filed for $1.675 million while the Diamondbacks countered at $1.275 million. McFarland ended up settling for just under the midpoint of those two figures.

McFarland, 29, was terrific out of the bullpen for the D-Backs last season, finishing with a 2.00 ERA and a 42/22 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. While the lefty may not miss a lot of bats, he does induce quite a few grounders. His 67.9 percent ground ball rate last season was the third highest among relievers with at least 50 innings, trailing only Brad Ziegler (71.1%) and Scott Alexander (70.6%).

McFarland was dominant against left-handed hitters, limiting them to a .388 OPS last season, but the D-Backs deployed him nearly twice as often against right-handed hitters, who posted an aggregate .764 OPS against him. It will be interesting to see if the club decides to use him more as a platoon reliever in 2019.