Tips for Ryan Braun’s upcoming rehabilitation tour

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As I said the other day, I feel like Ryan Braun is in a situation where no matter what he does and no matter what he says he will still be a pariah. Mark McGwire showed us that, as has every other publicly disgraced person who gets in front of a camera in an effort to come clean.

Sometimes they are less than forthcoming, true, but sometimes they say absolutely everything that can conceivably be said about the matter and they’re still slammed for evading or not being remorseful or whatever. The secret here is that most people really don’t want answers or explanations from these people. They’ve made up their minds and won’t listen. They just want the thrill of seeing someone squirm and the satisfaction of saying, after the fact, that the person is still a piece of garbage.  I feel like Braun will get this treatment in spades.

But others aren’t as cynical as me. Bob Wolfley of the Journal-Sentinel spoke with some experts and P.R. professionals about what Braun could say or do to actually get on the road to redemption.  It’s a fascinating and, actually, quite excellent article that covers just about every angle of the matter.

This from former commissioner Fay Vincent was the first insight:

One is, he should see that the problem is a very serious problem for baseball, not think that the Ryan Braun case is about Ryan Braun … secondly he should, in my view, go to somebody like the commissioner and say what can I do to go around and make it clear to fans and to people in baseball that we’ve got to do something to keep these drugs from infecting the rest of the game?”

Nice, but if you don’t think the response to that would be (1) “Braun is not taking personal responsibility, he’s blaming ‘the game'”; and (2) yeah, sure, look at his cynical P.R. efforts, just like A-Rod working for the Hooton Foundation!” you’re crazy, Fay.

The stuff from a P.R. expert is way better: a full confession and apology with no “buts” in the comments, anonymous charity work and an eschewing of the limelight. I feel, however, that a lot of that would be construed as “Braun has gone away to hide.”  Other P.R. people in the column talk about how it’s too late and how Braun can never redeem his reputation.  I suspect they may be right.  Former Mets pitcher Ron Darling is not so pessimistic and believes that there is a chance for Braun.

I know that Braun’s reputation is not the concern of people outside of Braun himself, but I find it a fascinating sidelight to this grand opera.

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.