Catchers are suffering concussions at an alarming rate

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Twins catcher Joe Mauer was placed on the seven-day concussion disabled list yesterday after taking multiple foul tips off his mask in Monday’s game led to dizziness 24 hours later and as LaVelle E. Neal III of the Minneapolis Star Tribune notes Mauer is the fifth catcher currently on the concussion DL.

Mauer joins Alex Avila, John Jaso, Carlos Corporan, and Yorvit Torrealba on the concussion DL and within the past month fellow catchers Salvador Perez, Ryan Doumit, and David Ross have been sidelined by concussions. Even minor league catching prospect Tommy Joseph of the Phillies recently had his season ended by a concussion.

Obviously plenty of non-catchers have had concussions too, but the rate at which catchers are suffering brain injuries this season is startling. At any given time there are somewhere between 60 and 75 catchers on MLB rosters and within the past 30 days around 15 percent of them have been on the disabled list specifically designed for concussions. MLB has made major strides in terms of concussion awareness and treatment in general, but it’s time to take a long look at the physical toll catching takes on someone’s brain before careers and lives are ruined.

Astros release Jon Singleton

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The Astros have released first baseman Jon Singleton, Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle reports.

Singleton, 26, was suspended for 100 games after testing positive for a drug of abuse for a third time. He has had issues with marijuana in the post and admitted to being a drug addict several years ago. He said, “At this point it’s pretty evident to me that I’m a drug addict. I don’t openly tell everyone that, but it’s pretty apparent to myself. I know that I enjoy smoking weed, I enjoy being high and I can’t block that out of my mind that I enjoy that. So I have to work against that.”

Singleton played parts of two seasons in the majors in 2014-15 with the Astros, batting a combined .171/.290/.331 with 14 home runs and 50 RBI in — appropriately — 420 plate appearances. He spent 2016 with Triple-A Fresno and 2017 with Double-A Corpus Christi, putting up middling numbers.

If he can convince teams he’s still actively working to overcome his addiction, Singleton may be able to find an opportunity elsewhere. But his road back to the majors remains long. He was once a top prospect in the Phillies’ system, then was traded to the Astros in the Hunter Pence deal back in July 2011.