Catchers are suffering concussions at an alarming rate

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Twins catcher Joe Mauer was placed on the seven-day concussion disabled list yesterday after taking multiple foul tips off his mask in Monday’s game led to dizziness 24 hours later and as LaVelle E. Neal III of the Minneapolis Star Tribune notes Mauer is the fifth catcher currently on the concussion DL.

Mauer joins Alex Avila, John Jaso, Carlos Corporan, and Yorvit Torrealba on the concussion DL and within the past month fellow catchers Salvador Perez, Ryan Doumit, and David Ross have been sidelined by concussions. Even minor league catching prospect Tommy Joseph of the Phillies recently had his season ended by a concussion.

Obviously plenty of non-catchers have had concussions too, but the rate at which catchers are suffering brain injuries this season is startling. At any given time there are somewhere between 60 and 75 catchers on MLB rosters and within the past 30 days around 15 percent of them have been on the disabled list specifically designed for concussions. MLB has made major strides in terms of concussion awareness and treatment in general, but it’s time to take a long look at the physical toll catching takes on someone’s brain before careers and lives are ruined.

Orioles designate Pedro Alvarez for assignment

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The Baltimore Orioles are terrible and going nowhere fast, so they decided to do some shuffling of the decks today.

One part of that was to called up catcher Caleb Joseph, which was the corresponding move to sending down Chance Sisco the other day. Joseph will now be big league teammates with brother Corban. Aww.

Another thing they did was to purchase the contract of Steve Wilkerson from Triple-A Norfolk. He’s a utility guy who has been swinging a hot bat after getting a late start to the season due to a 50-game drug suspension. Good for him, but that’s bad news for Pedro Alvarez, who was designated for assignment in the corresponding move.

Alvarez, 31, started the season well but has been atrocious for most of it. His line on the year is .180/.283/.414 with eight homers, but he’s been far worse than that for over a month. The 2013 NL home run champ will now go through waivers and, at the end of that process, likely have to choose between free agency or a trip to Norfolk. And, given that it’s the worst team in baseball sending him packing, there’s a good chance that it could be the end of the big league road for him.