And That Happened: Yasiel Puig’s benching edition

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Dodgers 6, Marlins 4: Yasiel Puig was benched because of attitude issues and poor play but then was used as a pinch hitter and smacked the go-ahead homer. My thing on the benching itself: it’s Don Mattingly’s team and he knows it best and can do what he wants.

What I really, really dislike, however, is the sentiment from the armchair managers like Plaschke and Morosi and others who called for the benching and then nodded when it happened with their gatekeeping/pledge-hazing sanctimony and their conviction that this young man needs to be a taught a lesson for some reason. Plaschke notes disapprovingly of Puig’s “swagger.” Which is funny, because guys like him are the first to call for the return of “swagger” when a team is playing poorly. Maybe it’s just bad when Puig does it because, well, I guess you’ll have to ask Plaschke.

File this all under “we are fans and observers,” not coaches, and that we should be bummed when a great, exciting talent like Puig is benched for whatever reason. Chiming in with “this is the right thing to do” as if Puig presents some real problem for the team that outweighs the benefits he brings is just distasteful to me. Go raise your own kid.

Sorry, just a tad grumpy this morning. And, for reasons that aren’t terribly important, unable to get to a full-blown And That Happened either. Apologies. Here are the scores. Perhaps I’ll regain my swagger later this morning.

Rockies 5, Phillies 3
Yankees 8, Blue Jays 4; Yankees 3, Blue Jays 2
Diamondbacks 5, Reds 2
Rays 7, Orioles 4
Mets 5, Braves 3
Twins 6, Tigers 3
Nationals 4, Cubs 2
Rangers 4, Astros 2
Brewers 6, Cardinals 3
White Sox 2, Royals 0
Pirates 8, Padres 1
Indians 4, Angels 1
Giants 3, Red Sox 2
Mariners 7, Athletics 4

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?