Miguel Tejada was also linked to Biogenesis

11 Comments

Royals infielder Miguel Tejada was handed a 105-game suspension from MLB over the weekend following multiple positive tests for amphetamine use, but Pedro Gomez of ESPN.com reports that the former American League MVP was also implicated in the recent Biogenesis investigation. In fact, it appears MLB leveraged his link to Biogenesis to get him to drop an appeal on his 105-game suspension.

Major League Baseball had the choice of going after the 2002 American League MVP for the Biogenesis case, as the league did 13 other players earlier this month, or for the amphetamine case. MLB chose to suspend Tejada after he tested positive for a third time in his career for amphetamines.

Tejada, according to a source familiar with the case, was given the choice of either accepting the 105-game suspension for amphetamine use or facing additional punishment for his Biogenesis connection. Tejada was allegedly a customer of Tony Bosch’s shuttered clinic, which is at the heart of baseball’s recent rash of suspensions. Bosch supplied evidence that Tejada had been a Biogenesis customer.

Tejada has been linked to performance-enhancing drugs dating back to the Mitchell Report and plead guilty to misleading Congress back in 2009. He admitted to purchasing human growth hormone (HGH) in the past, but claimed that he threw the drugs away before injecting them. It’s not clear what he may have purchased from Biogenesis, but any denials are going to ring pretty hollow at this point.

The Royals recently moved Tejada to the 60-day disabled list following a calf strain, so his season was essentially over anyway, but the suspension will also knock him out of commission for the first 64 games in 2014. The 39-year-old has insisted that he doesn’t plan to retire, but there’s a real chance that we have seen the last of him in the majors.

Pitch clock cut minor league games by 25 minutes to 2:38

mlb
Rich Schultz/Getty Images
0 Comments

NEW YORK — Use of pitch clocks cut the average time of minor league games by 25 minutes this year, a reduction Major League Baseball hopes is replicated when the devices are installed in the big leagues next season.

The average time of minor league games dropped to 2 hours, 38 minutes in the season that ended Wednesday, according to the commissioner’s office. That was down from 3:03 during the 2021 season.

Clocks at Triple-A were set at 14 seconds with no runners on base and 19 with runners. At lower levels, the clocks were at 18 seconds with runners.

Big league nine-inning games are averaging 3:04 this season.

MLB announced on Sept. 9 that clocks will be introduced in the major leagues next year at 15 seconds with no runners and 20 seconds with runners, a decision opposed by the players’ association.

Pitchers are penalized a ball for violating the clock. In the minors, violations decreased from an average of 1.73 per game in the second week to 0.41 in week 24.

There will be a limit of two pickoff attempts or stepoffs per plate appearance, a rule that also was part of the minor league experiment this season. A third pickoff throw that is not successful would result in a balk.

Stolen bases increased to an average of 2.81 per game from 2.23 in the minors this year and the success rate rose to 78% from 68%.

Many offensive measurements were relatively stable: runs per team per game increased to 5.13 from 5.11 and batting average to .249 from .247.

Plate appearances resulting in home runs dropped to 2.7% from 2.8%, strikeouts declined to 24.4% from 25.4% and walks rose to 10.5% from 10.2%. Hit batters remained at 1.6%.