Major League Baseball pretty much has to suspend Ryan Dempster, right?

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Not an original thought — I saw a lot of people including Keith Law say it last night — but after Ryan Dempster clearly and repeatedly threw at Alex Rodriguez last night, they have to suspend him, don’t they? If they don’t, doesn’t every pitcher in baseball get carte blanche to throw at A-Rod too?

What’s more, if you don’t suspend Dempster in that situation — a situation in which almost every other pitcher gets a suspension — don’t you give fuel to A-Rod’s “Major League Baseball is Out to Get Me” defense his lawyers have been floating lately?

It seems clear, but I feel like silly thinking like this from Joel Sherman may prove pretty common too:

 

A “tacit defense?” Not sure how it could be seen that way. It would really just be a matter of enforcing the rules that have always existed. And, as we noted earlier, it’s not at all clear that’s why Dempster was throwing at Rodriguez anyway.

Strip away the drama and it’s a pretty simple situation: one player was acting in a low rent fashion, the other was shaking it all off and leading his team to victory in such a manner as it could very well turn their season around.

All Hail A-Rod.

Brian Anderson suffers hand fracture on a hit-by-pitch

Brian Anderson
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Marlins infielder/outfielder Brian Anderson departed Friday’s 19-11 win over the Phillies with a left hand contusion, the club announced. Following an X-ray, it was then revealed that he had sustained a fracture of the fifth metacarpal — an injury severe enough that it’ll likely keep him off the field for the remainder of the 2019 season.

Anderson suffered the injury on a hit-by-pitch in the third inning. On the first pitch of the at-bat, with the bases loaded and one out, he took a 93.9-m.p.h. fastball off his left hand. The HBP forced in a run, but he doubled over in pain and was quickly examined by a member of the Marlins’ staff before officially departing the game in the top of the fourth.

It’s an unfortunate way to end Anderson’s third campaign with the Marlins. The 26-year-old has posted some career-high numbers this year, reaching the 20-homer mark for the first time and batting a healthy .261/.342/.468 with an .810 OPS and 3.0 fWAR through 510 PA. Despite the setback, he should be fully healed and ready to go well in advance of the Marlins’ spring training in 2020.