On the heels of the Miguel Tejada suspension, Mike Pelfrey discusses benefits of Adderall use

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Miguel Tejada received a 105-game suspension from Major League baseball after testing positive for amphetamines for a second and third time this year. The suspension would run through the first 65 games of the 2014 season, which may simply push the 39-year-old Tejada into retirement instead.

On the heels of that news, Twins starter Mike Pelfrey talked with Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press about his own legal, by-the-book use of Adderall to treat his ADHD. You should read the whole article here, but here is an illuminating snippet:

“When I don’t take my Adderall, my mind, my thoughts are just all over the place,” he said. “When I’m taking it, I’m able to focus on one task and able to do one thing instead of (having) 20 different things pop in your head. It definitely helps.”

Without an attention deficit disorder or ADHD diagnosis, Adderall could give a player additional energy, Pelfrey said.

“When you don’t need it, it acts like a true amphetamine,” he said. “I don’t get all amped up on it. I’m probably more laid back when I’m on it. My thought process is toned down to one thing instead of 20 different things. Without it I’m pretty hyperactive and running around.”

Though it is easy to look at Pelfrey’s 5.26 ERA and snicker, it can be tough to muster the energy to play at peak athletic form on a day-in, day-out basis over a six-month span, which is why more and more players have been testing positive for amphetamine use in recent years rather than steroids.

Former Colorado Rockies outfielder Ryan Spilborghs wrote a column earlier this year suggesting that Major League Baseball could reduce the need for players to rely on performance-enhancing drugs by expanding rosters and putting a cap on the maximum amount of games in which a player can play. Of course, the issue is complex enough that a couple tweaks to the rules won’t fix the issue, but it does show that the onus is not just on the players.

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.