Miguel Tejada suspended 105 games for amphetamines

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We have likely seen the last of Miguel Tejada in MLB.

According to Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports, Tejada will be suspended 105 games following multiple positive tests for Adderall. He will begin serving the suspension immediately.

Tejada, 39, had already tested positive for amphetamines in the past, but he tested positive twice again recently. A second positive test carries a 25-game suspension while a third has an 80-game penalty, so that’s where the 105-game figure comes from. Players are allowed to use Adderall if they have a TUE (therapeutic use exemption), but Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that Tejada’s expired on April 15.

This will be the third-longest non-lifetime suspension ever handed out by MLB, behind Alex Rodriguez (211 games) and Steve Howe (119 days). Tejada was recently moved to the 60-day disabled list with a calf strain, which essentially ruled him out for the rest of the season anyway. However, Passan hears that he is “strongly leaning toward retiring” rather than sit out the first 64 games next year.

Tejada, who won the AL MVP Award in 2002, made a comeback this season and was batting .288/.317/.378 with three home runs and 20 RBI over 53 games. He has previously admitted to buying human growth hormone while playing with the Athletics, but claims that he threw away the drugs before using them. Rafael Palmeiro infamously blamed his positive PED test on a B-12 shot he received from Tejada.

UPDATE: It’s official. Below is the announcement from MLB:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball announced today that Kansas City Royals infielder Miguel Tejada has received a 105-game suspension without pay after testing positive for an Amphetamine in violation of Major League Baseball’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.  The suspension of Tejada is effective immediately.

Major League Baseball told Kolten Wong to ditch Hawaii tribute sleeve

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Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Major League Baseball has told Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong that he has to get rid of the colorful arm sleeve he’s been wearing, pictured above, that pays tribute to his native Hawaii and seeks to raise awareness of recovery efforts from the destruction caused by the erupting Mount Kilauea.

Goold:

[Wong] has been notified by Major League Baseball that he will face a fine if he continues to wear an unapproved sleeve that features Hawaiian emblem. Wong said he will stash the sleeve, like Jose Martinez had to do with his Venezuelan-flag sleeve, and find other ways to call attention to his home island.

Willson Contreras was likewise told to ditch his Venezuela sleeve.

None of these guys are being singled out, it seems. Rather, this is all part of a wider sweep Major League Baseball is making with respect to the uniformity of uniforms. As Goold notes at the end of his piece, however, MLB has no problem whatsoever with players wearing a non-uniform article of underclothing as long as it’s from an MLB corporate sponsor. Such as this sleeve worn by Marcell Ozuna, and supplied by Nike that, last I checked, were not in keeping with the traditional St. Louis Cardinals livery:

ST. LOUIS, MO – MAY 22: Marcell Ozuna #23 of the St. Louis Cardinals celebrates after recording his third hit of the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fifth inning at Busch Stadium on May 22, 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

If Nike was trying to get people to buy Hawaii or Venezuela compression sleeves, I’m sure there would be no issue here. They’re not, however, and it seems like creating awareness and support for people suffering from natural, political and humanitarian disasters do not impress the powers that be nearly as much.