Someone impersonated Shane Spencer on the radio, claimed to have “dabbled” in steroids

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The biggest question I have in all of this is, of all of the people you could impersonate, why would you impersonate Shane Spencer?

Anyway, someone pretended to be Spencer, called into an Albany, NY radio station and claimed to have “dabbled” in steroid use.  The real Spencer heard about it and set the record straight. The radio station issued this statement:

“Yesterday we ran an interview we thought was with Shane Spencer. Unfortunately, after the interview was aired, we learned that the interview was with an impostor. During the interview, the Spencer impostor said that he used performance enhancing drugs and accused other players of doing the same while pretending to be Spencer. The real interview was scheduled to take place in advance and was set-up through the official Major League Baseball Players Association.

The real Shane Spencer agreed to come on the air and conduct an interview setting the record straight. We here at 104.5 The Team ESPN Radio thank Shane for coming on the air and clarifying this unfortunate situation. We, along with Shane, share the opinion that such criminal actions are not funny, have no sense of purpose, are bad for the individuals involved, and are bad for baseball as well as radio in general.”

Is it really “criminal” to call in to a radio station and pretend to be someone else? Unless you’re gaining something from it or trying to actually defraud someone I think it just falls under the category of “dumb prank.” But we live in a time where a lot of things that used to just be dumb pranks are now considered criminal so maybe I’m living in the past.

Anyway: if this is legal, I feel like Kevin Maas and Charlie Hayes should probably be extremely cautious over the next several weeks. Just to be safe.

Angels place Andrew Heaney on 10-day injured list

Andrew Heaney
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The Angels have placed Andrew Heaney on the 10-day injured list with left shoulder inflammation, the club announced Saturday. The move is retroactive to July 17, though it’s not yet certain that he’ll be cleared to pitch again by the end of the month.

It’s an unfortunate development for the 28-year-old southpaw, who has battled inflammation in his pitching elbow on and off since spring training. In fact, his arm issues date back several years, including the shoulder impingement that put him on the shelf in 2017 and the Tommy John surgery he underwent in 2016. With such a complicated medical history, it makes sense that the Angels would want to proceed with caution as they facilitate the lefty’s eventual return to the mound.

Given his ongoing struggles, Heaney has seen mixed results with the club in 2019. Prior to his recent IL assignment, he pitched to a 1-3 record in nine starts with a 5.09 ERA, 3.7 BB/9, and 10.6 SO/9 through 46 innings. Since the end of June, however, his starts have gotten shorter and shorter; he lasted just 4 1/3 innings in his final outing against the Astros, expending a tremendous 103 pitches and issuing two runs, two walks, and five strikeouts during the team’s eventual 7-2 win.

In a corresponding roster move, the Angels claimed lefty reliever Adalberto Mejía off of waivers from the Twins. Mejía, 26, is expected to be activated ahead of Saturday’s game versus the Mariners. Over 13 appearances with Minnesota, he turned in an 8.80 ERA, 7.0 BB/9, and 8.8 SO/9 in 15 1/3 innings.