Someone impersonated Shane Spencer on the radio, claimed to have “dabbled” in steroids

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The biggest question I have in all of this is, of all of the people you could impersonate, why would you impersonate Shane Spencer?

Anyway, someone pretended to be Spencer, called into an Albany, NY radio station and claimed to have “dabbled” in steroid use.  The real Spencer heard about it and set the record straight. The radio station issued this statement:

“Yesterday we ran an interview we thought was with Shane Spencer. Unfortunately, after the interview was aired, we learned that the interview was with an impostor. During the interview, the Spencer impostor said that he used performance enhancing drugs and accused other players of doing the same while pretending to be Spencer. The real interview was scheduled to take place in advance and was set-up through the official Major League Baseball Players Association.

The real Shane Spencer agreed to come on the air and conduct an interview setting the record straight. We here at 104.5 The Team ESPN Radio thank Shane for coming on the air and clarifying this unfortunate situation. We, along with Shane, share the opinion that such criminal actions are not funny, have no sense of purpose, are bad for the individuals involved, and are bad for baseball as well as radio in general.”

Is it really “criminal” to call in to a radio station and pretend to be someone else? Unless you’re gaining something from it or trying to actually defraud someone I think it just falls under the category of “dumb prank.” But we live in a time where a lot of things that used to just be dumb pranks are now considered criminal so maybe I’m living in the past.

Anyway: if this is legal, I feel like Kevin Maas and Charlie Hayes should probably be extremely cautious over the next several weeks. Just to be safe.

Joe Musgrove shut down with ab discomfort

Joe Musgrove
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Pirates right-hander Joe Musgrove is done for the year after suffering an abdominal wall muscle strain and stress reaction in his pelvic bone. While he isn’t expected to undergo surgery or miss additional time in 2019, he’s been prescribed six weeks of rest before resuming any baseball-related activities.

Musgrove, 25, finished out his third year in Pittsburgh with a 6-9 record in 19 starts, backed by a 4.06 ERA, 1.8 BB/9, and 7.8 SO/9. Despite logging a career-high 115 1/3 innings at the major league level, he’s also been dogged by a string of injuries, from the shoulder strain that robbed him of eight weeks at the start of the season to an index finger infection that kept him sidelined for a minimum 10-day stay on the disabled list in June.

While he works his way back up to full strength yet again, rookie right-hander Nick Kingham is expected to cover for him and will make a spot start during the Pirates’ series finale against the Brewers on Sunday. The 26-year-old righty hasn’t started a single game for the team since August 1, and currently carries a 4.69 ERA, 2.7 BB/9, and 8.1 SO/9 over 71 innings out of the rotation and bullpen.