Should the Phillies fire Charlie Manuel now?

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Bob Brookover of the Philadelphia Inquirer suggests that the Phillies should do right by Charlie Manuel and remove the uncertainty about his future by letting him go before the season is over.

Brookover writes:

Anything other than a harmonious conclusion would be sad and shameful, because the Phillies have meant so much to Manuel and vice-versa.

If the Phillies plan on keeping Manuel around for another year, which I do not think is the case, then they should get it done.

If they’re hoping for a smooth transition from Manuel to Sandberg and the current manager knows it, then why not get that message out to the public as soon as possible?

Manuel joined the Phillies after the 2004 season. Under his leadership, the Phillies have won 779 and lost 634 (.551). The Phillies won the NL East five years in a row from 2007-11, won the World Series in 2008, and tried unsuccessfully to repeat in 2009. This season portends to be the first losing season for the Phillies since Manuel took over.

The belief is that, after the Phillies move on from Manuel, Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg — currently the third base coach and formerly the manager of the Triple-A Lehigh Valley IronPigs — will be installed as the new manager as the team begins a transitional period of sorts.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?