Miguel Cabrera goes yard off Mariano Rivera for second time in three days but Tigers lose 5-4

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Tigers slugger Miguel Cabrera continues to do rude things to baseballs and some of baseball’s greats.

Cabrera stuck Yankees closer Mariano Rivera with a blown save on Friday night when he launched a game-tying 427-foot home run to deep center field. He then homered off Mo again on Sunday afternoon at Yankee Stadium as the Tigers marched back to tie the game at 4-4 with a two-run top of the ninth. Victor Martinez also homered off Mo in that frame.

Detroit wound up losing Friday’s game 4-3 in the 10th inning and fell 5-4 Sunday in the bottom of the ninth, but the story here is Cabrera’s monstrous outpout and Rivera’s sudden struggles.

With that homer Sunday, Cabrera joined Edgar Martinez and Evan Longoria as the only other right-handed hitters with two career home runs off Rivera. No player has homered three times off Mo.

Cabrera, 30, is now batting .365/.459/.686 with 36 homers and 101 RBI in 108 games this season.

Rivera, meanwhile, has been knocked around in three straight appearances and has three consecutive blown saves to show for it. Brett Gardner rescued the Yankees on Sunday with a walkoff home run.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.