Alex Rodriguez reportedly bought legal supplements in 2012 from BALCO founder Victor Conte

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This story from investigative reporters Teri Thompson and Michael O’Keefe of the New York Daily News adds a funny little wrinkle — but probably nothing more — to the ongoing Alex Rodriguez PED saga.

A-Rod apparently went on a desperate hunt for performance-enhancers of any kind in early 2012, enlisting the help of former NFL linebacker and admitted steroid user Bill Romanowski to set up a meet-and-greet with BALCO founder Victor Conte.

Conte, who spent four months in prison in 2005 on BALCO-related charges, could not provide A-Rod with any illegal performance-enhancing drugs. But Conte did get A-Rod some legal supplements and has now relayed his entire experience with the veteran slugger to the Daily News. Here’s an excerpt:

[Conte] described how Rodriguez showed up uninvited on his doorstep in May 2012 with admitted BALCO steroid casualty Bill Romanowski, the former NFL linebacker, to discuss legal products that could give Rodriguez an edge.

Conte said Rodriguez had been trying to set up a sitdown through Romanowski for two months before they finally met, the day before the Yankees kicked off a three-game series with the Oakland A’s.

Romanowski had tried to convince Conte to fly to New York or Los Angeles to meet with Rodriguez, but Conte said he declined the offer.

“I flushed it out with Romo before they ever showed up at the office,” Conte said. “I clearly told Romo it (anything he could do for Rodriguez) was about legal performance enhancement.”

Conte’s daughter Veronica hand-delivered a package of over-the-counter supplements to A-Rod’s hotel room when the Yankees were playing in Oakland on May 25, 2012 and two packages of the same legal stuff were eventually shipped to Rodriguez at addresses in Miami Beach and Greenwich Village. Victor Conte told the Daily News that he spoke to Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch twice over the phone because A-Rod had referred to Bosch as his “nutrition guy” and Conte didn’t want to overlap certain supplement regimens.

Tim Anderson on Joe West: “I don’t have much to say about him. Everybody knows he’s terrible.”

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During the top of the ninth inning of Saturday night’s 7-3 loss to the Cubs, White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson was ejected by umpire Joe West. Anderson attempted to complete a double play started by second baseman Yoan Moncada, but Javier Báez slid hard into Anderson at the second base bag to disrupt him. Anderson’s throw went past first baseman Matt Davidson, allowing a run to score.

White Sox manager Rick Renteria challenged the ruling on the field, but it was upheld after replay review. Anderson had a brief conversation with umpire Joe West then went back to his position. Shortly thereafter, West ejected Anderson, who became irate.

After the game, Anderson said of West, via Vinnie Duber of NBC Sports Chicago, “I asked him a question, and he kind of got pissed at me. I asked him if he saw [Báez] reach for my leg in the replay. He asked me if I was going to argue that, and I said, ‘No, I was just asking a question.’ And after that I didn’t say anything else. He started barking at me. Kept staring me down. I gave him, ‘Why you keep looking at me?’ Did that twice and threw me out.”

Anderson then said, “I don’t have much to say about him. Everybody knows he’s terrible. But I didn’t say much and he threw me out. It’s OK.” Anderson added about the play in which one can see Báez reach his arm out to interfere with Anderson, “Yeah, definitely. You could see it in the replay. That’s just one of the many that they missed in New York, I guess.”

Anderson’s criticism of West doesn’t come as a surprise. West has had a reputation as an instigator for decades. Major League Baseball almost never holds umpires accountable for their conduct on the field and some umpires, like West, take advantage of this knowledge.

It was a bittersweet ending for Anderson as he homered earlier in the game, becoming the first White Sox shortstop ever to have 20 home runs and 20 stolen bases in the same season. It’s just the sixth 20/20 season in White Sox history, joining Alex Ríos (2010, 2012), Ray Durham (2001), Magglio Ordóñez (2001), and Tommie Agee.

Anderson accounted for the only run the White Sox scored on Sunday against the Cubs with an RBI double. On the season, he’s hitting .243/.284/.412 with those 20 homers, 26 steals, 64 RBI, and 76 runs in 594 plate appearances.