We’re all sick of A-Rod yet we can’t stop watching

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It’s hard to take issue with the overall thrust of Tyler Kepner’s latest at the New York Times: everyone is sick of A-Rod, but the fact is that we can’t look away:

After all these years with Rodriguez — 10 now, and very slowly counting — we are still talking about tiresome controversies of his making. We are doing so not because we want to, not because we even care much anymore. In the stands, in the clubhouse, in the executive suites, even in the press box — believe me — everyone has an acute case of A-Rod fatigue.

We continue to pay attention for one reason: Alex Rodriguez is spectacularly famous.

There is certainly a disconnect between how much we all say we’re sick of A-Rod and how much attention he is paid. Yankee Stadium was a lot closer to capacity last night than it has been. I bet the TV ratings for last night’s game were higher. The press says it’s sick of covering A-Rod, but the scene at Yankee Stadium last night was pretty nuts: multiple times the usual number of reporters and photographers than is usually on hand. I see the stats for the posts we do about Rodriguez — the posts so many of you in the comments say you’re sick of — and they have substantially higher traffic than most things we’ve been doing lately.

No one particularly likes A-Rod but I don’t think it’s at all accurate to say we have “A-Rod fatigue.” We can’t get enough, for whatever reason. He’s that restaurant Yogi Berra talked about that time: no one goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.