We’re all sick of A-Rod yet we can’t stop watching

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It’s hard to take issue with the overall thrust of Tyler Kepner’s latest at the New York Times: everyone is sick of A-Rod, but the fact is that we can’t look away:

After all these years with Rodriguez — 10 now, and very slowly counting — we are still talking about tiresome controversies of his making. We are doing so not because we want to, not because we even care much anymore. In the stands, in the clubhouse, in the executive suites, even in the press box — believe me — everyone has an acute case of A-Rod fatigue.

We continue to pay attention for one reason: Alex Rodriguez is spectacularly famous.

There is certainly a disconnect between how much we all say we’re sick of A-Rod and how much attention he is paid. Yankee Stadium was a lot closer to capacity last night than it has been. I bet the TV ratings for last night’s game were higher. The press says it’s sick of covering A-Rod, but the scene at Yankee Stadium last night was pretty nuts: multiple times the usual number of reporters and photographers than is usually on hand. I see the stats for the posts we do about Rodriguez — the posts so many of you in the comments say you’re sick of — and they have substantially higher traffic than most things we’ve been doing lately.

No one particularly likes A-Rod but I don’t think it’s at all accurate to say we have “A-Rod fatigue.” We can’t get enough, for whatever reason. He’s that restaurant Yogi Berra talked about that time: no one goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.

Cardinals extend José Martínez through 2020

Jose Martinez
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First baseman/outfielder José Martínez agreed to a two-year contract extension with the Cardinals on Saturday, per a team announcement. MLB Network’s Jon Heyman reports that Martínez will receive $3.25 million in the deal plus incentives if he earns a more stable place within the starting lineup.

Martínez, 30, played 887 games in the minors before making his major-league debut with the Cardinals at the tail end of the 2016 season. The veteran first baseman has been nothing but productive in the three years since his debut, however, and turned in a career-best performance in 2018 after slashing .305/.364/.457 with 17 home runs, an .821 OPS, and 2.3 fWAR through 590 plate appearances. While he brings some positional flexibility to the table, he’ll be forced to compete against Dexter Fowler and Tyler O'Neill for a full-time gig in right field this year, as Paul Goldschmidt currently has a lock on first base.

According to Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the extension wasn’t solely precipitated by Martínez’s productivity in the majors, but by a competing offer from an unnamed Japanese team over the offseason. Goold adds that Martínez would have earned “significantly more than he would in the majors” had the club sold his rights. In the end, they ultimately elected to ink him to a more lucrative deal themselves. He’ll be eligible for arbitration in 2020.