We’re all sick of A-Rod yet we can’t stop watching

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It’s hard to take issue with the overall thrust of Tyler Kepner’s latest at the New York Times: everyone is sick of A-Rod, but the fact is that we can’t look away:

After all these years with Rodriguez — 10 now, and very slowly counting — we are still talking about tiresome controversies of his making. We are doing so not because we want to, not because we even care much anymore. In the stands, in the clubhouse, in the executive suites, even in the press box — believe me — everyone has an acute case of A-Rod fatigue.

We continue to pay attention for one reason: Alex Rodriguez is spectacularly famous.

There is certainly a disconnect between how much we all say we’re sick of A-Rod and how much attention he is paid. Yankee Stadium was a lot closer to capacity last night than it has been. I bet the TV ratings for last night’s game were higher. The press says it’s sick of covering A-Rod, but the scene at Yankee Stadium last night was pretty nuts: multiple times the usual number of reporters and photographers than is usually on hand. I see the stats for the posts we do about Rodriguez — the posts so many of you in the comments say you’re sick of — and they have substantially higher traffic than most things we’ve been doing lately.

No one particularly likes A-Rod but I don’t think it’s at all accurate to say we have “A-Rod fatigue.” We can’t get enough, for whatever reason. He’s that restaurant Yogi Berra talked about that time: no one goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.

Brian Anderson suffers hand fracture on a hit-by-pitch

Brian Anderson
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Marlins infielder/outfielder Brian Anderson departed Friday’s 19-11 win over the Phillies with a left hand contusion, the club announced. Following an X-ray, it was then revealed that he had sustained a fracture of the fifth metacarpal — an injury severe enough that it’ll likely keep him off the field for the remainder of the 2019 season.

Anderson suffered the injury on a hit-by-pitch in the third inning. On the first pitch of the at-bat, with the bases loaded and one out, he took a 93.9-m.p.h. fastball off his left hand. The HBP forced in a run, but he doubled over in pain and was quickly examined by a member of the Marlins’ staff before officially departing the game in the top of the fourth.

It’s an unfortunate way to end Anderson’s third campaign with the Marlins. The 26-year-old has posted some career-high numbers this year, reaching the 20-homer mark for the first time and batting a healthy .261/.342/.468 with an .810 OPS and 3.0 fWAR through 510 PA. Despite the setback, he should be fully healed and ready to go well in advance of the Marlins’ spring training in 2020.