David Wright may miss the rest of the season

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Mets third baseman David Wright has been out since August 3 with a strained right hamstring. The initial prognosis had him missing three to five weeks, which would have had him back towards the end of August at the earliest, but manager Terry Collins is aware there is a chance the cornerstone of his lineup may have played his last game of 2013.

Via MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo:

“No question,” Collins said when asked if Wright might not return from a strained right hamstring. “There’s nothing etched in stone. We’re hoping certainly that it’s four weeks. If it’s five, it’s five. If it’s six, it’s six. If he gets back, tremendous. That means the healing process and all the rehab stuff will work. But there is absolutely no timetable at all.”

Before landing on the disabled list, Wright had a .904 OPS, tops among National League third basemen. With 16 home runs and 17 stolen bases, he was well on his way to his third career 20/20 season.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.