Bruce Bochy Walked Adam Jones to get to Chris Davis. It didn’t work.

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There are all kinds of ideas that, when looked at up close in objective terms, seem to make a lot of sense. Many of these ideas, however, don’t look so good from 10,000 feet. And certainly don’t look good in hindsight.

And yes, this is hindsight. But there is no escaping the fact that, ultimately, Bruce Bochy decided, with two out in the 10th inning last night, to intentionally walk Adam Jones to get to one of the most fearsome hitters in baseball this season. Chris Davis made him pay for that decision.

Bochy began the 10th with lefty Javier Lopez on the hill. Which made sense because because two of the first three Orioles hitters — Nate McLouth and Nick Markakis — are left-handed. Lopez retired both of them. Manny Machado is not left-handed, however, and he doubled in between those outs. That brought Adam Jones — a righty — to the plate with two outs.

Bochy could have had Lopez try to retire Jones, platoon splits be damned. Or he could ave called in Santiago Casilla or Sergio Romo to face Jones. He chose not to do that. Instead he walked Jones to go lefty-on-lefty, Lopez vs. Davis. All Davis did was double to deep center, scoring both Machado and Jones and putting his Giants in a hole out of which they couldn’t climb. It was essentially the ballgame.

Playing the percentages. Playing the platoon splits. That makes sense. Putting a much worse hitter than Chris Davis on base and giving Davis a chance to bat? That really doesn’t. And Bruce Bochy learned that the hard way last night.

Jim Crane thought the heat over sign-stealing would blow over by spring training

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The Astros’ sign-stealing story broke in November, a steady drumbeat of coverage of it lasted through December and into January, when Rob Manfred’s report came out about it. The report was damning and, in its wake, Houston’s manager and general manger were both suspended and then fired.

After that a steady stream of media reports came out which not only made the whole affair seem even worse than Manfred’s report suggested, but which also suggested that, on some level, Major League Baseball had bungled it all and it was even worse than it had first seemed.

Rather than Manfred and the Astros putting this all behind them, the story grew. As it grew, both the Red Sox and Mets fired their managers and, in a few isolated media appearances, Astros’ players seemed ill-prepared for questions on it all. Once spring training began the Astros made even worse public appearances and, for the past week and change, each day has given us a new player or three angrily speaking out about how mad they are at the Astros and how poorly they’ve handled all of this.

Why have they handled it so poorly? As always, look to poor leadership:

Guess not.

In other news, Crane was — and I am not making this up — recently named the Houston Sports Executive of the Year. An award he has totally, totally earned, right?