Lars Anderson and “the burden of analytical thought”

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Gabe Kapler has a fascinating article up at WEEI about the mental approach of hitters. Specifically, Lars Anderson, the once cant-miss Red Sox prospect who, inexplicably, has missed. Anderson is out to sea now, having failed to fulfill his promise. Kapler tells a pretty compelling story of a kid who is insanely gifted but whose mental approach to the game has handicapped him. About how he has succumbed to “the burden of analytical thought.”

In some ways this is a longer version of “don’t think, it can only hurt the ballclub.” But Kapler doesn’t think it’s a rule. He talks about watching Anderson come up — a guy who focuses on his failures rather than his successes — vs. Josh Reddick, who has always thought he could hit anything, even if he couldn’t. Kapler talks about how Anderson is extremely intelligent but put creates mental hurdles for himself. He thinks Reddick and guys like him could do better if they thought even for a minute. There is a balance to be had. But if it’s out of balance, one presumes, it’s better to err on the side of swinging violently and thinking yourself invincible than it is to be smart but to lack confidence.

Just a fascinating read from Kapler, who does a great job of explaining a concept that is so often lost in translation between those inside the game and those outside.

Long time NL umpire Dutch Rennert has died

MLB.com
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MLB.com reports that long time umpire Dutch Rennert has died at the age of 88.

Rennert retired as a National League umpire after the 1992 season, so a lot of you didn’t get a chance to see him. But believe me, if you got a chance to see him in action, you’d remember him. He had one of the most distinct strikeout calls in history. He’d go turn to the side, go down on one knee, point with purpose and bellow “STRIKE . . . ONNNNNNEEEEE!”

It was quite the scene, man:

 

I used to love it when Rennert called a game I was watching on TV. I always knew the count.

Rest in Peace, Dutch. I cannot vouch for the peace of whoever is on the cloud next to yours, though.