Former Cubs minor leaguer wins “The Bachelorette”

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I don’t watch “The Bachelor” or “The Bachelorette,” but since I’m clearly not above writing about reality television shows when they have some baseball connection I figured this was worth passing along.

Apparently the winner of this season’s “The Bachelorette” is a former Cubs minor league pitcher named Chris Siegfried, who was drafted in the 11th round out of the University of Portland in 2007.

Sara Vallone of CSNChicago.com has more:

The left-handed pitcher started in the Cubs minor league system with Boise, spending a little more than a month with the Hawks before being sent to Peoria where he played until 2009. Later that year, he was promoted to Daytona. Siegfried hung up his spikes in 2011 after playing with Fargo-Moorhead of the Independent League.

During his five-year career, Siegfried appeared in 142 games, pitched 294 2/3 innings with a 4.64 ERA, had 224 strikeouts and ended with a 14-20 overall record.

If nothing else he fared better than Jeff Kent on “Survivor.”

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.