Apparently ego and vanity are the only reasons A-Rod is appealing

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That’s if you believe Bob Klapisch, of course.  He takes a look at A-Rod’s return to the Yankees and — despite noting that the Yankees are awful and A-Rod is actually looking like he is capable of helping the team — he casts a cynical eye on Rodriguez’s presence on the Yankees. And it’s not even a money thing. Klapisch even admits that anyone would play if there was money at stake so it’s hard to fault Rodriguez for that. But:

Given the inevitable humiliation that awaits, A-Rod is using the last two months of the season to build up equity with the fans. Only a fool would believe that’s possible – that home runs in meaningless games will clear the stench of years of PEDs use. But that’s how Rodriguez rolls, swaddled by ego, a tone-deaf vanity and his PR staff that never let Rodriguez forget he is larger than life. So A-Rod on about rescuing the Yankees, but he has to know that’s beyond anyone’s grasp. Instead, it’s all about the stage – his stage, just the way baseball’s greatest narcissist likes it.

I forgot the part where A-Rod claimed he could “rescue the Yankees,” but hey, if you want to paint someone in the most negative light possible sometimes you have to take some liberties. After all, it’s boring to say that A-Rod is playing because (a) he’s a healthy baseball player under contract; who (b) is eligible to play because his suspension is under appeal. Much better to chalk it all up to vanity and ego and stuff.

But really, the efforts people are taking to make mounting a defense to a draconian punishment look like evidence of bad character on A-Rod’s part is amusing. I mean, it’s not like you need to find new avenues for attacking A-Rod’s character. But even if you do, this is an odd one, as I’m really curious to know whether Klapisch or any of his like-minded noble souls would simply roll over and accept four times (and then some) the workplace punishment they thought they were subject to beforehand.  Would they not fight that, even if they were as guilty as sin? Would they not continue coming to work if their union contract said they could?

Nah, of course they wouldn’t. They aren’t so vain, egocentric and narcissistic as all that, I’m sure. They’d just disappear.

Cole Hamels done for year after just 1 start for Braves

Cole Hamels triceps injury
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ATLANTA — After making just one start for the Atlanta Braves, Cole Hamels is done for the season.

Hamels reported shortly before the start of a four-game series against the Miami Marlins that he didn’t feel like he could get anything on the ball. The left-hander was scheduled to make his second start Tuesday after struggling throughout the year to overcome shoulder and triceps issues.

The Braves placed Hamels on the 10-day injured list, retroactive to Sept. 18,, but that was a mere formality. General manager Alex Anthopoulos already contacted Major League Baseball about replacing Hamels in the team’s postseason player pool.

“Cole knows himself and his body,” Anthopoulos said. “You trust the player at that point when he says he can’t go.”

The Braves began Monday with a three-game lead in the NL East .and primed for their third straight division title.

Even with that success, Atlanta has struggled throughout the shortened 60-game series to put together a consistent rotation beyond Cy Young contender Max Fried and rookie Ian Anderson.

Expected ace Mike Soroka went down with a season-ending injury, former All-Star Mike Foltynewicz was demoted after just one start, and Sean Newcomb also was sent to the alternate training site after getting hammered in his four starts.

The Braves have used 12 starters this season.

Anthopoulos had hoped to land another top starter at the trade deadline but the only deal he was able to make was acquiring journeyman Tommy Milone from the Orioles. He’s on the injured list after getting hammered in three starts for the Braves, giving up 22 hits and 16 runs in just 9 2/3 innings.

“There’s no doubt that our starting pitching has not performed to the level we wanted it to or expected it to,” Anthopoulos said. “I know that each year you never have all parts of your club firing. That’s why depth is so important.”

Hamels, who signed an $18 million, one-year contract last December, reported for spring training with a sore shoulder stemming from an offseason workout.

When camps were shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic, Hamels was able to take a more cautious approach to his rehabilitation. But a triceps issue sidelined again before the delayed start of the season in July.

The Braves hoped Hamels would return in time to provide a boost for the playoffs. He also was scheduled to start the final game of the regular season Sunday, putting him in position to join the postseason rotation behind Fried and Anderson.

Now, Hamels is done for the year, his Braves’ career possibly ending after he made that one appearance last week in Baltimore. He went 3 1/3 innings, giving up three runs on three hits, with two strikeouts and one walk in a loss to the Orioles.

Hamels reported no problems immediately after his start, but he didn’t feel right after a bullpen session a couple of days ago.

“You’re not going to try to talk the player into it,” Anthopoulos said. “When he says he isn’t right, that’s all we need to hear.”

Atlanta recalled right-hander Bryse Wilson to replace Hamels on the 28-man roster. The Braves did not immediately name a starter for Tuesday’s game.

With Hamels out, the Braves will apparently go with Fried (7-0, 1.96), Anderson (3-1, 2.36) and Kyle Wright (2-4, 5.74) as their top three postseason starters.

Hamels is a four-time All-Star with a career record of 163-122. He starred on Philadelphia’s World Series-winning team in 2008 and also pitched for Texas and the Chicago Cubs.

Last season, Hamels went 7-7 with a 3.81 ERA in 27 starts for the Cubs.