And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Royals 13, Twins 0: Hard to envision any more of a domination than this. A four hit shutout for Jeremy Guthrie while the Royals offense puts up a baker’s dozen. Jamey Carroll was literally the most effective pitcher of the game for the Twins. Eric Hosmer drove in five.

Dodgers 3, Cardinals 2: Fifteen straight road wins for the Dodgers. That’s … improbable. Two more road wins in a row and they tie a 97 year-old NL record owned by the Giants. The 83-84 Tigers own the all-time record with 21.

Tigers 4, Indians 2: The Indians can be as hot as they want to when they play everyone else but this inability to beat the Tigers is kind of a drag for them. Detroit scored all four of their runs in the ninth thanks to Chris Perez totally melting down. The rally was capped by an Alex Avila with a three-run homer.

Braves 3, Nationals 2: That’s 11 straight for the streaking Braves, who extend their lead to 13.5 games in the NL East. Justin Upton homered. This race is run.

White Sox 8, Yankees 1: All the fuss was about A-Rod, but the real story here may be another old guy: Andy Pettitte was absolutely awful, letting baserunner after baserunner reach while allowing seven runs in two and two-thirds. We may have reached the end of the Pettitte road, folks. Four driven in for Alex Rios

Giants 4, Brewers 2: Three hits for Brandon Belt and a broken bat RBI single for Jeff Francoeur to put the Giants ahead to stay. After the game he talked about adjusting his stance and returning to some toe-tapping timing thing he used in Atlanta but got away from in Kansas City. I’m sure that means he’s all fixed now and will return to 2005 form.

Astros 2, Red Sox 0: You can’t stop Brett Oberholtzer, you can only hope to contain him (7 IP, 4 H, 0 ER).

Rangers 5, Angels 2: Adrian Beltre homered, Martin Perez pitched effectively and the Rangers won their seventh in eight. Nelson who?

Blue Jays 3, Mariners 1: A three-run rally in the eighth helps R.A. Dickey to his first win in a month. Big crowd on hand as a ton of British Columbians came down to see Brett Lawrie play. Canadian hordes, really, in all likelihood doing recon for an impending invasion.

Mike Leake loses perfect game bid on leadoff single in the ninth

Mike Leake
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Just one week after Taylor Cole and Felix Peña tossed a combined no-hitter against Seattle, Mariners right-hander Mike Leake worked on his own perfect game through eight innings against the Angels.

It was an ambitious form of revenge, and one that Leake served up perfectly as he held the Angels scoreless in frame after frame. He sprinkled a handful of strikeouts throughout the first eight innings, catching Matt Thaiss on a called strike three in the third and getting two whiffs — called strikeouts against both Brian Goodwin and Shohei Ohtani — in the fourth.

The Mariners, meanwhile, put up a good fight against the Angels, backing Leake’s attempt with 10 runs — their first double-digit total since a 13-3 rout of the Orioles on June 23. Daniel Vogelbach led things off in the fourth with a three-run homer off of reliever Jaime Barria, then repeated the feat with another three-run shot off Barria in the fifth. Tom Murphy and J.P. Crawford helped pad the lead as well with a two-RBI single and two-RBI double, respectively.

In the ninth, with just three outs remaining, the Angels finally managed to break through. Luis Rengifo worked a 1-1 count against Leake, then returned an 85.3-m.p.h. changeup to right field for a base hit, dismantling the perfecto and the no-hitter in one fell swoop. Leake lost control of the ball following the hit, issuing four straight balls to Kevan Smith in the next at-bat and giving the Angels their first runner in scoring position. Still at a pitch count of just 90, however, he induced the next two outs in quick fashion and polished off the win with a triumphant eight-pitch strikeout against Mike Trout for the first one-hitter (and Maddux) of his career.

Had Leake successfully closed out the perfecto, it would’ve been the first of his decade-long career in the majors and the first the Mariners had seen since Félix Hernández’s perfect game against the Rays in August 2012. For their part, the Angels have yet to be on the losing end of a perfecto. The last time they were shut out in a no-hitter was 1999, at the hands of then-Twins pitcher Eric Milton.