Alex Rodriguez: “I’m fighting for my life”

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On the heels of MLB announcing a 211-game suspension earlier this afternoon, Alex Rodriguez held a press conference this evening at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago. If you were looking for any major revelations in regard to his alleged PED use and Biogenesis, you were probably disappointed. Not surprisingly, he declined to discuss any of the details. However, he did have some interesting things to say.

Rodriguez began the press conference with some brief opening remarks, during which he expressed his relief to be back in a Yankees uniform, not only after the Biogenesis investigation but also a tough rehab process following hip surgery in January.

“The last seven months have been a nightmare. Probably the worst time of my life, for sure. Obviously for the circumstances that are at hand and also dealing with a tough surgery and rehab program and being 38. I am thrilled and humbled to have the opportunity to put on this uniform again and play major league baseball again. I feel like I was 18 years old back in Fenway Park in 1994 when I went in to face the Red Sox for the very first time. It’s been 20 years. And I’m just very excited for the opportunity to go out there and play baseball and help my team win. And prove to myself, my teammates, the fans of New York, the fans of baseball, that I still have the shot to play the game at a high level and I’m going to give it my best.”

On why he has decided to appeal his suspension 211-game suspension from MLB:

“I’m fighting for my life, I have to defend myself. If I don’t defend myself, no one else will.”

When asked directly whether he used PEDs:

“We’ll have a forum to discuss all that and we’ll talk about that then.”

On whether he would drop his appeal after seeing what evidence MLB has against him:

“We’ve seen everything. There will be a time and place for everything. When the time is right we’ll all speak more freely.”

On what it feels like to get back on the field:

“For me, it’s going to be business as usual. I’ve got a job to do.”

When asked whether he thinks the Yankees want him back:

“If I’m productive, I think they want me back.”

Rodriguez got off to a good start, singling in his first at bat of 2013 as boos came from the stands.

Here’s video from the press conference:

The allegations against Rodriguez and others were first revealed in late January, when the Miami New Times published a report that connected them to Bosch and his clinic. Bosch reportedly provided a group of MLB players with human growth hormone and steroids as early as December 2011. The New Times story, along with reports by Yahoo! Sports and ESPN, reportedly spurred MLB’s investigation.

“Despite the challenges this situation has created during a great season on the field, we pursued this matter because it was not only the right thing to do, but the only thing to do,” Selig said.

Bosch faces a federal inquiry into whether Biogenesis illegally distributed steroids to high school students and major leaguers, according to reports by ESPN and the Miami Herald. Bosch’s lawyer, Susy Ribero-Ayala, has not responded to messages left by NBC Sports.

The matter reportedly is being handled by Jeff Novitzky, the federal agent who directed investigations of BALCO, a clinic in the Bay Area that was found to have distributed steroids to athletes.

Rodriguez, 38, is fifth on MLB’s career home run list, with 647 spread over two decades with three teams. Barry Bonds holds the record, with 762, but many fans believe that mark to be illegitimate because of Bonds’ tie to BALCO.

Rodriguez admitted in 2009 that he used steroids for three years, from 2001-03, while he was a member of the Texas Rangers. His name also appeared on a list of 104 players who tested positive for PEDs in a 2003 MLB survey, according to a report by Sports Illustrated.

The survey, which was confidential, reportedly was done to measure the extent of baseball’s problem with performance-enhancing drugs, not to determine who was actually using them. So Rodriguez’s alleged positive test could not have resulted in punishment.

Rodriguez has yet to play this year after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his left hip in January. His recovery efforts stalled in mid-July, when he strained his left quadriceps. Rodriguez claimed he was ready to return. The Yankees said he was not.

Rodriguez sought a second opinion from a New Jersey doctor, who examined an MRI of the slugger’s leg and proclaimed him fit both over the telephone and in a subsequent media blitz. The Yankees were displeased that Rodriguez sought a second opinion without informing them in writing first, according to ESPN.

Giants hire Gabe Kapler as new manager

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The Giants announced on Tuesday the hiring of Gabe Kapler as manager. Kapler, filling the extremely large shoes of future Hall of Famer Bruce Bochy, inked a three-year deal, Alex Pavlovic of NBC Sports Bay Area reports. Kapler was one of three finalists for the job, beating out Astros bench coach Joe Espada and Rays bench coach Matt Quataro.

Following his 12-year playing career, Kapler was a coach for Israel’s team in the 2013 World Baseball Classic qualifier. He then became an analyst for FS1 before joining the Dodgers’ front office as the director of player development in November 2014. He was involved in three scandals there: one in which he tried to handle a sexual assault incident involving two Dodgers minor league players without telling police, one in which he allegedly discriminated against Nick Francona, a veteran and former baseball operations employee, and an incident that implicated most of the Dodgers’ front office concerning the recruiting of international free agents. The Dodgers reportedly kept a spreadsheet of employees and their level of criminality.

Despite Kapler’s background, the Phillies hired him as their manager ahead of the 2018 season. He would lead the Phillies to an 80-82 record that year and then helped them improve by one game in 2019, finishing at exactly .500 before being fired. Kapler’s tenure in Philly was tumultuous, often drawing ire from the local media and subsequently the fan base for not being tough enough on his players. The Phillies also reportedly had a clubhouse issue in 2018 in which players were playing video games in the clubhouse during games, prompting Carlos Santana to smash a TV with a bat.

Kapler has a history with Farhan Zaidi, the Giants’ president of baseball operations. They worked together in the Dodgers’ front office as Zaidi served as GM from November 2014-18.