After three years, Pedro Feliciano returns to majors

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Pedro Feliciano had his contract purchased by the Mets on Friday and is back in the majors for the first time since 2010.

After making a whopping 92 appearances with the Mets in 2010, Feliciano signed a two-year, $8 million deal with the Yankees over that winter. He went down the next spring with what was originally called triceps soreness and then missed two years after shoulder surgery. He returned to the Mets on a minor league deal this spring, only to be set back by a heart condition. As if that wasn’t enough, after debuting in the minors in April, he was stricken by a case of severe food poisoning that cost him over a month.

Feliciano, who turns 37 later this month, ended up posting a 1.29 ERA and a 19/4 K/BB ratio in 21 innings in the minors. His velocity isn’t what it used to be, but he might still be capable of finessing his way through some left-handed hitters. Regardless, it’s a nice story that he’s getting another shot. He was a horse for the Mets in the second half of the last decade. From 2007 through 2010, he averaged 86 appearances per year.

To put that in perspective, since 2007, only two other pitchers have made 86 appearances in a season: Jon Rauch (88 in 2007) and Peter Moylan (86 in 2009). Last year, the major league leaders had 80 appearances.

Oakland Athletics reverse course, will continue to pay minor leaguers

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Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that Oakland Athletics owner John Fisher has reversed course and will continue to pay minor leaguers. Fisher tells Slusser, “I concluded I made a mistake.” He said he is also setting up an assistance fund for furloughed employees.

The A’s decided in late May to stop paying paying minor leaguers as of June 1, which was the earliest date on which any club could do so after an MLB-wide agreement to pay minor leaguers through May 31 expired. In the event, the A’s were the only team to stop paying the $400/week stipends to players before the end of June. Some teams, notable the Royals and Twins, promised to keep the payments up through August 31, which is when the minor league season would’ve ended. The Washington Nationals decided to lop off $100 of the stipends last week but, after a day’s worth of blowback from the media and fans, reversed course themselves.