Tony Bosch may not be well advised to testify in Biogenesis appeals

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This morning I linked a story about the feds taking an interest in Biogenesis and investigating whether or not it sold drugs to high schoolers and things.  The Daily News has a more thorough story about it here.

I hadn’t thought of this before — my lawyer skills are atrophied, it seems — but a friend of mine just pointed out that this set of circumstances could possibly present a problem for Major League Baseball.

The problem: as a target of a federal investigation, Bosch would be well-advised to clam the heck up. If he testifies or speaks anywhere, his comments will be used against him in any subsequent criminal proceedings. That includes if he speaks at, say, an arbitration following a ballplayer’s appeal of a Major League Baseball suspension. If Bosch has a good lawyer, that lawyer is telling him NOT to go on the record anyplace if he fears federal prosecution. Especially given that his testimony at an MLB arbitration would be all about how he sold drugs to people.

Now, this doesn’t necessarily create a huge problem. For one thing, Bosch’s former employee, Porter Fischer is both cooperating with the feds and Major League Baseball. It could very well be that baseball is relying way more on him than Bosch and that his testimony would be sufficient. It’s also possible that Bosch himself is under no illusions that he’s going to escape federal pain and could very well make a deal with the feds in time to help baseball if they need his testimony to sustain player discipline.

But it is an interesting wrinkle. One that, if you were a lawyer for a player trying to decide whether or not to appeal Biogenesis discipline, could certainly impact your thinking on the matter.

Dodgers add Scott Alexander to World Series roster, drop Caleb Ferguson

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Just as the Red Sox did, the Dodgers swapped out a pitcher for the World Series, replacing lefty Caleb Ferguson with lefty Scott Alexander.

Ferguson, a rookie, had made six appearances in the postseason, facing only one batter on three occasions and no more than three batters in any outing. He hasn’t allowed any hits or runs in three aggregate innings of work and has walked only one. The Dodgers might be concerned about his workload, however, as his velocity dipped as the NLCS wore on.

In Alexander, the Dodgers get a lefty with a bit more durability. Alexander pitched in 73 games in 2018. He made the NLDS roster, appearing in one game against the Braves, pitching a perfect inning in Game 3.

Here’s the entire World Series roster for Los Angeles: