The Royals finally use the disabled list again

8 Comments

But, don’t worry, it’s just for Chris Getz.

The major criticism with the Royals’ decision to buy and not sell at the trade deadline was that they did nothing to address the black hole in their lineup at second base. Now they’ll be forced to try something a little different after Getz suffered a sprained knee in a collision with Adam Dunn over the weekend. Getz was hitting just .209/.280/.281 with one homer and 14 RBI in 153 at-bats on the season.

Remarkably, it’s only the second time the Royals have used the disabled list since Opening Day. It’s truly a remarkable run of health, though it hasn’t led to a better-than-expected record at 53-51. Reserve outfielder Jarrod Dyson was the only other player to go on the DL; he missed a month with a sprained ankle in the first half. They also had pitchers Felipe Paulino and Danny Duffy start off on the 60-day DL after both underwent Tommy John surgery last year.

Getz’s exit makes room for the newly acquired Justin Maxwell on the Royals’ roster, Johnny Giavotella is on the shelf in Triple-A, so he wasn’t a candidate to replace Getz right now. There wasn’t room for him anyway with the Royals carrying five outfielders. They’ll go with Elliot Johnson and Miguel Tejada at second base.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

Getty Images
6 Comments

Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.