Pitcher who took $7 million for nothing decries “welfare leeches”

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UPDATE: Braden has contacted me on Twitter, taking issue. He says that he does not believe all welfare recipients are “leeches.” Rather, only those who use drugs and receive public assistance are “leeches.”  He has not explained to me how that squares with his desire to “test the welfare leeches” for drugs. Because, if they’re only leeches once they use, why are we testing them? We already know they use!

Braden is a pitcher, not a writer, so it’s possible that he merely mistyped and demanded that something else be done with “leeches” besides testing them. And that the testing not be for “leeches” but for the good people who have fallen on hard time. So that we can determine if, in fact, they are leeches.

9:14 AM: One can believe that the welfare state as currently constructed is not the best way to help those in need and/or is not the best use of resources. That’s just a matter of philosophy and politics and values and stuff and reasonable people can disagree without being rude and insensitive.

Unemployed pitcher Dallas Braden, however, is not interested in philosophical debates:

Pretty big talk for a guy who took nearly $7 million from the Athletics for a grand total of three starts between 2011 and 2012.

Oh, wait: you mean there were extenuating circumstances there? His inability to pitch those years was because of injury and not because he was some lazy leech sucking off the teet of some rich benefactor without doing anything in return? That he actually would have preferred to work for his money but simply was unable to due to the hand he was dealt? But that’s impossible! I am told by people like Braden himself that everyone who is paid without having to work is an awful bum.

In other news: there are some people from the 209 who live on government assistance. I wonder what they think of their crusading superhero and lord protector.

Former minor leaguer Aaron Cox, brother-in-law of Mike Trout, dies at 24

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Aaron Cox, until recently a minor leaguer in the Angels’ system, and the brother-in-law of Angels star Mike Trout, has died at the age of 24. The circumstances of Cox’s death are not known. Trout, who is married to Cox’s sister, Jessica, has left the Angels to be with his family and will likely miss the next couple of games.

Cox, like Trout, was a star at Millville High School in New Jersey. He was a few years behind Trout and went on to play at Division II Gannon University, where he pitched a no-hitter. He was drafted by the Angels in the 19th round of the 2015 draft and pitched for three seasons as a reliever in the lower rungs of the Angels system. This season he pitched 11 games for high-A Inland Empire but had recently retired. He had missed the entire 2017 season after being hit in the eye by a line drive during spring training and then getting a 50-game suspension for unauthorized use of a stimulant.

The Angels just released a statement from the Trout and Cox families:

Early this morning our families lost a phenomenal human being. Aaron Cox was a tremendous son, brother, and brother-in-law. He had a deep love for his family and a passionate dedication and commitment to his friends. As our families grieve together, we will also celebrate the memories, the laughter, and the love we each shared with Aaron in the short time we had him. He will forever be at the forefront in the hearts and minds of the Cox and Trout families. We will rely on the love and strength of God first and foremost during this difficult and channeling time, as well as our dear family and friends. We thank you for your thoughts and prayers, and our Lord and Savior for His precious gift of Aaron Joseph.