Blue Jays aim for Angels’ Howie Kendrick

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2:32 p.m. EDT update: FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal hears that the Angels are likely to keep Kendrick since they haven’t been offered the kind of starting pitcher they want.

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Residing in last place with a 49-57 record in the AL East, the Blue Jays aren’t looking for any rentals at the trade deadline. However, they do have their eyes on the Angels’ Howie Kendrick, according to Ben Nicholson-Smith of Sportsnet.cn.

Kendrick could fill the hole at second base that’s been a problem for Toronto this year. The Blue Jays recently tried Brett Lawrie there, only to quickly move him back to third. The 30-year-old Kendrick has hit .301/.344/.446 with 11 homers and 45 RBI in 395 at-bats for the Angels. He’s under control through 2015 and is owed about $22 million over the next 2 1/3 seasons, but he became a bit more expendable last night with the pickup of Grant Green in the Alberto Callaspo deal with Oakland.

In return for Kendrick, the Angels would certainly prefer young, cost-controlled starting pitching. The Jays don’t have a lot to offer, though, not with Brandon Morrow hurt yet again. Chad Jenkins, their most major league-ready pitcher in Triple-A, is also on the DL. They do have intriguing arms further away, but those might not be so tempting to an Angels team that will aim to contend in 2014. Infielder-outfielder Emilio Bonifacio would make sense as a lesser part in a deal, but not as the prime piece.

Pitch clock cut minor league games by 25 minutes to 2:38

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NEW YORK — Use of pitch clocks cut the average time of minor league games by 25 minutes this year, a reduction Major League Baseball hopes is replicated when the devices are installed in the big leagues next season.

The average time of minor league games dropped to 2 hours, 38 minutes in the season that ended Wednesday, according to the commissioner’s office. That was down from 3:03 during the 2021 season.

Clocks at Triple-A were set at 14 seconds with no runners on base and 19 with runners. At lower levels, the clocks were at 18 seconds with runners.

Big league nine-inning games are averaging 3:04 this season.

MLB announced on Sept. 9 that clocks will be introduced in the major leagues next year at 15 seconds with no runners and 20 seconds with runners, a decision opposed by the players’ association.

Pitchers are penalized a ball for violating the clock. In the minors, violations decreased from an average of 1.73 per game in the second week to 0.41 in week 24.

There will be a limit of two pickoff attempts or stepoffs per plate appearance, a rule that also was part of the minor league experiment this season. A third pickoff throw that is not successful would result in a balk.

Stolen bases increased to an average of 2.81 per game from 2.23 in the minors this year and the success rate rose to 78% from 68%.

Many offensive measurements were relatively stable: runs per team per game increased to 5.13 from 5.11 and batting average to .249 from .247.

Plate appearances resulting in home runs dropped to 2.7% from 2.8%, strikeouts declined to 24.4% from 25.4% and walks rose to 10.5% from 10.2%. Hit batters remained at 1.6%.