How is baseball counting A-Rod’s violations, anyway?

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If A-Rod gets major discipline, it’s going to be because he’s seen as being a multiple-time violator of the drug agreement. Bill Madden of the Daily News was on the Boomer and Carton show today and he was asked what those multiple violations might look like. Here’s Madden:

“We are talking here (about) non-analytical violations, i.e. in absence of a positive drug test,” he said. “OK? Now, let’s just say for example, they have proof — good proof, legitimate proof, records, whatever — that Alex Rodriguez sought to buy drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez actually bought drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez was administered drugs. That’s a third violation.”

Um. OK.

Of course if that were the case every single player who ever tested positive for PEDs would be subject to triple discipline. Because to do that you have to first “seek to buy drugs” then you have to buy drugs then you have to take drugs.  I mean, that’s 100% unavoidable, yes?

I realize Bill Madden is not in charge of the discipline process, but he certainly has sources in MLB who are informing him of the thought process involved with the Biogenesis case. And this is what is passing for logic and justice with respect to A-Rod. We are in a world gone mad. Although, if you think about it, we could use this logic to shorten games:

[Batter at plates, Ump looks in. Batter swings and misses.]

Umpire: “Strike one-two-three, you’re out!!”

Player: “What?!”

Ump: “You thought about swinging, you swung, you missed! You’re out!”

[everyone nods and smiles at how nice it is that umpires are getting tough on batters]

Rangers don’t plan to make qualifying offer to Adrián Beltré

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Rangers GM Jon Daniels said he doesn’t expect the club to make a $17.9 million qualifying offer to free agent third baseman Adrián Beltré, MLB.com’s T.R. Sullivan reports. Daniels has been in touch with the 39-year-old, who may retire.

Beltré battled hip and hamstring issues throughout the past season, limiting him to 119 games. He hit .273/.328/.434 with 15 home runs and 65 RBI in 481 plate appearances. Going by adjusted OPS, his mark of 98 — 100 is average — was his lowest in a season since 2009 with the Mariners. Beltré’s career average is 116 and he put up a 132 in 2017 and 128 in ’16.

Beltré appears to have some stuff left in the tank. He may not be an All-Star-caliber player anymore, but he can still hit at an average level and he is still an above-average defender. It’s just a matter of his body holding up to allow him to do what he needs to do. If Beltré does decide to re-up with the Rangers for 2019, the club will be prepared to move Isiah Kiner-Falefa or Jurickson Profar over to the hot corner as they did in 2018 in the event Beltré gets bitten by the injury bug.