How is baseball counting A-Rod’s violations, anyway?

98 Comments

If A-Rod gets major discipline, it’s going to be because he’s seen as being a multiple-time violator of the drug agreement. Bill Madden of the Daily News was on the Boomer and Carton show today and he was asked what those multiple violations might look like. Here’s Madden:

“We are talking here (about) non-analytical violations, i.e. in absence of a positive drug test,” he said. “OK? Now, let’s just say for example, they have proof — good proof, legitimate proof, records, whatever — that Alex Rodriguez sought to buy drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez actually bought drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez was administered drugs. That’s a third violation.”

Um. OK.

Of course if that were the case every single player who ever tested positive for PEDs would be subject to triple discipline. Because to do that you have to first “seek to buy drugs” then you have to buy drugs then you have to take drugs.  I mean, that’s 100% unavoidable, yes?

I realize Bill Madden is not in charge of the discipline process, but he certainly has sources in MLB who are informing him of the thought process involved with the Biogenesis case. And this is what is passing for logic and justice with respect to A-Rod. We are in a world gone mad. Although, if you think about it, we could use this logic to shorten games:

[Batter at plates, Ump looks in. Batter swings and misses.]

Umpire: “Strike one-two-three, you’re out!!”

Player: “What?!”

Ump: “You thought about swinging, you swung, you missed! You’re out!”

[everyone nods and smiles at how nice it is that umpires are getting tough on batters]

Yasmani Grandal played himself out of NLCS Game 4

Harry How/Getty Images
1 Comment

Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal has not had a good postseason. Entering Monday night’s NLCS Game 3, he was batting .111/.238/.278 in 21 trips to the plate across the NLDS and the first two games of the NLCS.

Defense has also been an issue for Grandal. In Game 1 of the NLCS, Grandal was on the hook for two passed balls. In the sixth inning of Game 3 Monday night, he couldn’t corral a curve in the dirt, which allowed Travis Shaw to score the Brewers’ second run of the night. Starter Walker Buehler was charged with a wild pitch. In the eighth, with Ryan Braun on first base and Shaw at the plate, Grandal again couldn’t corral a pitch in the dirt, allowing Braun to move to second base. Fortunately for the Dodgers, Alex Wood was able to escape the inning with no damage.

Manager Dave Roberts said that Austin Barnes, not Grandal, will start behind the plate for Game 4 on Tuesday night, Andy McCullough of the Los Angeles Times reports. That comes as no surprise at all. When Grandal struck out with the bases loaded in the ninth inning, Dodger fans regaled him with boos.

Barnes will be an upgrade defensively, but he’s lacking with the bat. He had an 0-for-3 performance in Game 2, though with an RBI, bringing his career slash line in the playoffs to .200/.281/.300 across 57 plate appearances. During the regular season, his career 100 adjusted OPS is a fair bit behind Grandal’s 115. Roberts is trading offense for defense in Game 4. Rich Hill will get the start opposite the Brewers’ Gio González.