Angels bid for Diamondbacks’ Ian Kennedy

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The Angels aren’t buyers and the Diamondbacks aren’t sellers, but it seems they might be able to help each other out by doing an Ian Kennedy deal.

Both CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman and FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal have mentioned the possibility. The Padres are also in the running, says MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert.

With Brandon McCarthy (shoulder) set to rejoin the rotation next week and Trevor Cahill (hip, shoulder) just a week behind, the Diamondbacks appear flush with starters. They’ve been using Patrick Corbin, Wade Miley, Kennedy, Randall Delgado and Tyler Skaggs of late, though Skaggs has already been demoted to make room for McCarthy. They also have top prospect Archie Bradley making noise with a 2.28 ERA in 15 starts in Double-A.

The problem is that, other than maybe Corbin, there’s not one guy there that seems like a front-line starter for a postseason rotation. It’s why the Diamondbacks have been mentioned in connection with the White Sox’s Jake Peavy and the Cubs’ Jeff Samardzija. If they could move Kennedy and get a couple of prospects in return, it’d make biting the bullet on a Peavy trade a lot easier.

In Kennedy, the Angels would get a guy who has been a disappointment this year, but one who still makes a modest $4.3 million and who is under control through 2015. With few major league-ready arms in the farm system, he’d be a nice to have around, especially since he’ll cost about half as much as a comparable free agent starter next year.

Kennedy, 28, is 3-7 with a 5.22 ERA this year, though he’s still fanned 101 in 119 innings. He went 21-4 with a 2.88 ERA in 2011 and 15-12 with a 4.02 ERA in 2012, striking out 385 batters in 430 1/3 innings between the two seasons.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.