Florida judge denies motion to throw out MLB’s lawsuit against Biogenesis

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There was plenty of skepticism when MLB filed a lawsuit against Biogenesis and Anthony Bosch earlier this year, but they scored an important victory earlier today. Julie K. Brown of the Miami Herald has the story:

After pondering such thorny issues as stale cookies and a Major League baseball player who used the alias “Al Capone” to buy performance enhancing drugs, a Miami-Dade Circuit Court judge denied a motion to toss out the sport’s civil lawsuit against Biogenesis, the South Florida doping pipeline to baseball players and other professional athletes — as well as collegiate and high school players.

Monday’s decision, by Judge Ronald Dresnick, means that Major League Baseball can use the legal system to force witnesses to give depositions that may substantiate Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch’s story that his clinic supplied banned substances to high-profile major leaguers for many years.

MLB sued Biogenesis, Anthony Bosch, and other associates back in March, alleging that they interfered with players’ contracts by giving them performance-enhancing drugs. Bosch has since agreed to cooperate with MLB’s investigation. In return, he’ll be dropped from the lawsuit and receive help with his legal fees.

Those subpoenaed by MLB include former University of Miami pitching coach Lazaro Collazo, who is accused of acting as a middleman for the clinic. While he isn’t a part of MLB’s lawsuit against Biogenesis, he was among those arguing for its dismissal today. However, Dresnick’s ruling means that he could now be forced to talk under oath about what he knows. Alex Rodriguez’s cousin, Yuri Sucart, was also issued a subpoena by MLB.

The Giants are considering Pablo Sandoval at second base

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Pablo Sandoval could be tabbed to play second base in the near future, per a report from John Shea of the San Francisco Chronicle. According to Shea, Sandoval has been spotted taking grounders at second during pre-game warm-ups and may be considering switching to the keystone on a part-time basis.

It wouldn’t be the weirdest thing the 31-year-old corner infielder has done this year — that distinction goes to the flawless inning of relief he pitched in a blowout loss against the Dodgers last month. But it would represent a pretty notable departure from his comfort zone even so; Sandoval has primarily manned first and third base throughout his 11-year career in the majors and has also taken a few reps at DH during his resurgence with the Giants in 2018.

Of course, this wouldn’t necessarily be a permanent switch for Sandoval. As Shea points out, the Giants are thin on middle infielders after losing Joe Panik to a torn UCL in his left thumb and backup Alen Hanson to a left hamstring strain. Provided he can get up to speed quickly (no easy feat, according to infield coach Ron Wotus), he’d give the club some added depth behind Kelby Tomlinson and Miguel Gomez until Panik is ready to take the field again. Sandoval has impressed at the plate this spring, batting a healthy .270/.329/.429 with six extra-base hits and a .757 through 70 plate appearances.